Tagged Decorative surfaces

5 Building Materials for Eco-Friendly Interiors

5 Eco-Friendly Building Materials - Arclin TFL

Over the last decade, architecture and interior design have embraced more natural alternatives. And it is no surprise, when you consider that sustainability is an attractive move for both the planet and profit.

Architect Magazine reported in October that buildings consume about 40% of the energy in the U.S. annually. In addition, they are responsible for emitting nearly half of the carbon dioxide in our atmosphere. The 2017 article, “The Climate Is Changing. So Must Architecture,” calls for architects to use more sustainable materials that consume far fewer resources.

Consumers want healthier materials in their spaces that are kinder to our natural resources. Architects and interior designers need to seek out solutions such as designing LEED certified buildings, which can drop carbon dioxide emissions by more than 30% while reducing water and energy consumption.

While companies like Arclin are always developing innovative eco-friendly materials, here are five options to consider today when designing an eco-friendly interior.

Coco Tiles

Coco tiles are a natural alternative for flooring, backsplashes, walls, etc. Made from reclaimed coconut shells, this product reduces waste, while bringing a hint of nature into offices, restaurants, health care facilities and hotels. Kirei, a company focused on creating eco-friendly products, has mastered the art of the coco tile.

Bamboo

Bamboo has traditionally been used for decorating, but is now making a name for itself as an alternative building material. Using bamboo as flooring can be beneficial in more ways than one. Bamboo is water-resistant, and won’t stain like traditional hardwood flooring that swells when water is trapped inside a panel. And, bamboo flooring can be extremely durable depending on how it is manufactured, especially if it is strand woven. You can expect easy maintenance if you choose bamboo flooring.

Reclaimed Wood

Reclaimed wood can be used for flooring, furniture, ceiling beams, and so much more. Using reclaimed wood in interior design is an eco-friendly way to add character to any room. The color palettes affiliated with reclaimed wood are limitless. It can add a tropical atmosphere to a restaurant or a feeling of comfort to a healthcare facility. Reclaimed wood is an eco-friendly alternative to cutting down living trees for building materials. You can rest easy knowing that your interior design isn’t harming the environment.

Cork

Cork is a versatile material that can be used all over your home or in commercial spaces. Adding a sheet of cork to an office wall can offer sustainability, because the extraction process for cork does not harm the tree it is taken from and the bark it is made from replenishes every 9 years. It also adds convenience and utility to the room. Additionally, cork provides excellent insulation for both temperature and acoustics control. This cost-effective material has also been used for flooring, as its cushion-like surface is easy to stand on for long periods of time.

TFL

Our favorite green product of all is TFL — a cost-effective alternative to the other surface options on the market. When considering the use TFL in your next design project, remember that these products are versatile and work across a variety of applications and industries. With advanced printing technologies, these decorative overlays enable us to mimic the design properties of real wood, but it is made with papers derived from tree fibers grown on controlled, fast-growing plantations. Just take a look at designs like Charles Bridge to see what we mean!

 

The Right Surface for the Right Space

Let’s show them how TFL works!

You know it, we know it — TFL is one of the most versatile decorative surface options available in the market today. High performing, design-forward, versatile, cost effective and environmentally safe. And perfect for a wide variety of environments and applications.

Arclin is creating tools to help all of us in the TFL value chain. Tools that can help educate your customers and theirs by demonstrating the attributes and benefits of the product in a wide variety of applications. We’re creating an online gallery to showcase thermally fused laminates in their natural habitats. And that is, virtually everywhere. Share photos, ideas, customer applications…anything you think will help us, together, bring more people to the TFL table.


retail TFLRETAIL

Dark to light, traditional to contemporary, wood grains to abstracts, TFL fits any retail environment, any brand on store fixtures, shelving, POP displays, closets, walls and counters.

What’s your favorite retail application? Share it with us and we’ll share with the industry!


office TFLOFFICE

The perfect office combines durability and design. Just like TFL. For desks, cabinets, shelving, credenzas and walls.

What new applications are you seeing in the office industry for TFL? Is it in designs? Applications? Textures?


healthcare TFLHEALTHCARE

Designs made to heal. Germ-resistant surfaces. Zero-emitting panels. Use it on workstations, lockers, cabinets and furniture, in waiting areas, workspaces and patient rooms.

We’re seeing a lot more creativity in healthcare environments, as the market gets more competitive and designers are looking for design-forward and healthy surfaces. What trends do you see driving TFL use in healthcare? Can you give us an example?


hospitality TFLHOSPITALITY

On trend and in budget. TFL adorns walls, furniture, fixtures and more in hotels, restaurants and clubs around the world.

Restaurants and hotels are more and more becoming havens and drivers of design versus merely places for comfort and sustenance. Where do you see opportunities to integrate TFL that maybe even the industry isn’t thinking of yet?


education TFLEDUCATION

The smart solution — TFL is durable and easy to clean and comes in designs and colors suited for any educational environment. For furniture (classroom, library, dorm), closets and desks.

Budgets are often among the biggest drivers in building materials decisions for educational spaces. But we know you can get a hot new TFL for no more investment than the same old, same old. What designs do you see showing potential in education? Traditional woods? Lineals? Reclaimed materials-inspired?


residential TFLRESIDENTIAL

Durable, stain resistant and available in a wide variety of designs — from wood grains to abstracts, solid colors and more — TFL is ideal for kitchens, cabinets, closets, organizational systems, furniture, garages…even the man cave.

We’re excited about what we’re seeing in residential interiors. Because we’re seeing a little bit of everything! Show us your favorites — a photo, a link…an example of something you’re finding in the market.

Decorative surfaces

Why TFL. And Why Now.

Decorative surfaces have been around since the ancient Egyptians began using wood veneers to coat their furniture and sarcophagi. They’ve come a long way. Today, the market offers a variety of decorative surface options (there’s a good primer here), from veneers to High Pressure Laminates (HPL), from foils to perhaps one of the most overlooked and high performing surfaces available: Thermally Fused Laminates, or TFL. Every surface option has a distinct sweet spot — that is, uses and applications for which it’s most appropriate and effective. Here’s a quick summary of the properties and benefits of TFL. And a thing or two you might not have known about this advanced surface option that is quickly growing in popularity.

For the right applications, TFL is high performing at a lower cost than many of its sister products. Resin-coated papers are thermoset, under high heat and pressure, directly to a substrate (typically particleboard, plywood or MDF), which eliminates the need for multiple layers of base paper and creates a very uniform, strong surface — at a lower production cost than many other options.

TFL is just as design-forward as HPL has become, matching the graphic intensity and fidelity of woods, stone, metals, abstracts and more. Advancements in design and printing technologies and expanding market interests have driven TFL manufacturers to create increasingly realistic, beautiful and varied decors. Advanced laminating technologies have made textures possible, as well, adding yet another dimension to TFL’s life-like design properties.

TFL is an environmentally friendly alternative to solid woods and veneers. TFL uses paper derived from sustainably harvested sources. And through sophisticated design, TFL can realistically mimic the look and, increasingly, even the feel of any wood or abstract material without depleting valuable natural resources. Arclin TFL can contribute to LEED credits for improved indoor air quality and is manufactured in FSC chain of custody-certified facilities.

TFL’s consistency and durability makes it ideal for a wide variety of industries and applications.

Decorative surfaces are used in industries including Residential, Retail, Healthcare, Office, Education, Government and more. Applications: Cabinets, Furniture, Closets, Desks, Architectural Features and more.