Tagged hotel design

Bringing Home into Hotels

Since 2016, hotels have been a $199.3 billion industry in the U.S. alone. With all signs pointing to continued growth, hotels constantly must evolve and consider renovating their designs. One big emerging trend has been making hotels feel more homey as consumer preference trends away from the standardized looks. Big factors to these rapid changes are companies like Airbnb and HomeAway that provide a home away from home, luring hotel occupants to an alternative, more casual experience. As a result, many hotel chains are adopting the same sense of charm in their design. Here are a few ways hotels can bring a feeling of “home” to their guests.

Shared Spaces

Creating a living room-like shared space is one take on a sense of community that may be felt in a homestead. Hotels are beginning to deviate from traditional reception areas and take this approach in their designs. Hilton Embassy Suites’ newest hotel in Boulder, Colorado created an open living room and dining room concept in their lobby, and other hotels are leveraging similar design concepts. When it comes to using TFL designs in hotel “living room” areas, we like the dramatic feel of Charles Bridge — its cool tones and dramatic motion stand out from more traditional hotel styles.

Home Hotel - Charles Bridge - Arclin TFL

Activity Spaces

Guests who travel frequently are especially prone to enjoy activities that remind them of home. According to an article on Quartz Media citing Morgan Stanley Research, these guests are most likely to try Airbnb, reinforcing the notion that hotels should aim to cater to these preferences.

Designing spaces for activities is a great way to incorporate a home-like feel into hotels. A library stocked with popular literature and or an exercise room equipped with convenient storage cubbies, yoga mats and air diffusers can create a calming atmosphere. Arclin provides TFL designs that can help create this homey feel. Designs like Stinson Umber have the fidelity of real wood that provides a wonderful, natural accent in shelving units and desk spaces. 

Stinson Umber by Arclin TFL in Hospitality Design

Design+Convenience

Guests expect to have the same at-home conveniences in their hotel rooms. For example, many hotel rooms are now equipped with several USB ports and outlets, some are even included within the furniture itself to make the design look more elegant. You can achieve that elegant look with the dark, rich design of Noce Moscato — a stunning choice for accent walls, room built-ins and sitting areas. All can help create a warm, welcoming space.  

Offering updated storage solutions for long-term guests is another design feature growing in popularity. Traditional closets and drawers used to be standard, but now many hotels are opting for nooks, open closets for exposed clothing and storage underneath beds for bags.

Noce Moscato by Arclin TFL in Hotel Design

Before you jump into your next hospitality design projects, read our article on Alternative Building Materials That Create a Luxury Look Without a Luxe Price for some more great ideas.

Natural Connection: The Return of Bringing Nature Indoors

Look at any architecture or interior design trend list and you are bound to come across a list that touts how bringing nature back indoors is on the rise. And it is no surprise. Natural palettes and textures have been gaining momentum in both commercial and residential interiors. In part, the trend has been infiltrating interiors as reverberation from our technology-drenched lives. Sometimes, we just need to reset and go back to the basics. Here are two ways we are loving the modern version of bringing nature indoors.

Going Green

Interior Design - Arclin TFL - Green Wall

Avant-garde in the 1970’s, indoor gardens were a must-have. Today, designers understand that introducing more natural elements indoors add a peaceful touch that can help calm external chaos. This can be done by painting a single wall in the room a green tone, adding a plant wall, or simply just having green accented soft furnishings. All can be incorporated into hotel rooms, classrooms, and even hospitals.

Companies like Ambius specialize in interior landscaping. Though these plant walls are often found inside companies that want to accentuate their sustainability, they are increasingly being used for numerous other uses. From elevating oxygen levels in the space to increasing alertness among employees — these efforts ultimately improve the levels of employee productivity.

Into the Woods

Connected to nature Arclin TFLA 2015 study done by FPInnovations, a Canadian research center, looked into how adding wood into healthcare facilities provides benefits to both patients and their caretakers. In Wood as a Restorative Material in Healthcare Environments, the study showed that woodsy elements reduced stress in participants, among other hormonal and physical benefits.

Natural wood or wood textured decorative overlay allow for a connection with nature, even when inside. Healthcare isn’t the only ones on board with nature-based interior design — restaurants like Nærvær in Copenhagen and hotels like the Clarion in Sola, Norway are implementing these elements as well. Interior designers are aiming to create more tactile surfaces, from textured TFL to soft furnishings to create spaces that feel intimate and cozy.

At Arclin, we are inspired by natural designs and textures. Our Harvest Collection is inspired by natural elements from all over the world. This collection was intentionally cultivated to bring nature to you. Get in touch with Arclin TFL here for samples from our latest collection.