Tagged TFL

TFL Before and After: Hospitality Spaces

TFL in Hospitality

TFL, Hotel Room, Hospitality

The hospitality industry has, in the last decade, demonstrated continuing recovery from the Recession of the late 2000s. From 2009-2017, U.S. hotel bookings grew from $116 billion to $185 billion, while other sectors, such as restaurants, showed associated growth. At the same time, U.S. venues face increasing competition from international counterparts, making the drive to improve on infrastructure and amenities more and more essential.

From better lobby experiences to sleeker interiors, hospitality locations are evolving so they may bring more guests in, and keep them in their venues longer. Learn how Arclin’s decorative overlays for TFL can help make your hotel or food service location a friendlier, more profitable space.  

Design an Experience, Not Just a Space

common area tfl, Hospitality

Players in the hospitality industry face unique challenges – among them, the diverse range of stakeholders served and the growing expectations of these guests. While the physical elements of the places these consumers occupy are critical, “It’s also about designing an experience that flows,” says WATG|Wimberly Interiors, a hospitality design firm. Hoteliers are moving away from traditional, generic designs and toward an optimized visitor experience. For instance, a “blurring” between home experiences and hotel experiences, with more relaxed, yet stylish designs, are gaining popularity. Extended-stay hotels are increasingly mimicking home-like amenities, with emphasis on separate guest and visitor spaces and upgraded kitchen and bathroom facilities.

TFL, with its ability to serve as the foundation for any room, can set the stage for high-quality hotel stays. Equally at home in kitchen, bathroom, and living settings, TFL is the durable, functional option around which to build rooms and suites. In addition to being long-lasting, easy to clean, and maintain, TFL’s vast array of style options allows you to take your guest experience anywhere it needs to go.

Convenience Without Compromise: Restaurant Design Trends

TFL, Restaurant, social setting, design

Guests are seeking more from the locations they patronize – restaurants, cafes, and other food service locations are increasingly serving as spots for food, socialization, and work. Spaces are shifting to accommodate distance workers and telecommuters – those who are conducting business from home or alternative locations. This also includes those undertaking multiple roles (such as student and employee) from a single venue.

On one hand, this has placed a premium on an open concept, adaptable layouts that can accommodate these varied needs. At the same time, incorporating touches of elegance into design and offerings is also appreciated and rewarded by guests. For example, fine dining establishments are exploring ways to provide quality food experiences at lower price points, with associated shifts in design. Cafes and other venues associated with higher-dollar parent establishments are enjoying strong growth.

TFL, with its capacity to adapt to any sort of hospitality space you can envision, has you covered for walls, fixtures, and more. At once practical and elegant, it’s perfectly suited to restaurants-as-workspaces, those trying to achieve casual glamour, and anything in between. Contact Arclin to discuss possible design options, or with any questions you might have.

TFL Before and After: Education

As theories of design continue to evolve, it is undeniable that we are increasingly guided by the idea that the spaces in which we conduct our lives not only provide a stage for our activities, but can have a significant impact on the success of those activities. One arena where this notion is receiving particular attention is in the education sector. No longer do we subscribe to a model of schools with standardized, unimaginative classrooms and campus layouts. Instead, we move toward designs that provide greater learning and teaching options for students and instructors, embrace environmental consciousness, and support inspiring sensory experiences.

Arclin TFL can be the foundation of transformations for educational environments. With its functional, multi-use character, green sourcing, and design-forward options, TFL is the choice for building better schools.

Learning In (and Out) of the Classroom

Arclin TFL - Before & After TFL in Education

One of the most important changes in contemporary educational curricula is the idea that learning can – and should – happen in a variety of environments. E-learning technologies allow classes to be held practically anywhere, and more administrators and instructors are seeking ways to take students out of the confines of the traditional classroom. Open space learning environments, mock clinical settings, and building designs that transition seamlessly between indoor and outdoor areas are gaining traction in forward-thinking educational design.

TFL, with its durability, hygienic qualities, and wide range of applications, can accommodate the needs of these varied learning spaces. TFL designs are at home in office, healthcare, high-traffic, and residential spaces – all of which are applicable in new takes on educational architecture.

Green Learning

Arclin TFL - Before & After TFL in Education

Sustainability is a watchword for all aspects of contemporary life, and bringing tenants of environmentalism into classrooms is vital. Educational settings from preschools to universities are committing to campaigns such as enhanced recycling programs and community gardening, but the materials used to build learning spaces are also drawing more scrutiny.

Using TFL is an ideal way to make educational building environmentally conscious, from the ground up. Able to replicate the look of natural materials without depleting natural resources, TFL is manufactured in certified facilities, guaranteeing its responsible sourcing. TFL can also help in the LEED accreditation process, earning facilities greed building ratings. TFL can contribute to a healthier learning environment, both for those occupying the spaces, and the larger environments in which they are placed.

Inspiring Design

Arclin TFL - After Photo in University Collaboration Rooms

While functionality will always be a hallmark of educational design, gone are cookie cutter classrooms that are impossible to distinguish from one another. Instead, practical, serviceable spaces are being augmented with materials and colors meant to spark students’ and teachers’ creativity. Using spaces as a backdrop for exploration by providing multiple ways to learn in a single space, and by imbuing these spaces with stimulating materials is changing the way learning is leveraged.

Once again, Arclin TFL is up to the task. With an incredible array of choices in colors and finishes, we lay the foundation for exciting educational environments.

The Role of Community in Design

In an increasingly connected world, community is an expansive concept. It is made broader by the variety of ways in which we now communicate. We are members of multiple communities at any given moment: both in-person and virtually. The importance of community, and a desire to grow and nurture communities is having an impact on design. We increasingly seek places in which we can bring together the people important to us: family, friends, co-workers, and others. To this end, spaces such as community housing, multigenerational homes, and workspaces that facilitate collaboration are growing in popularity.

Arclin TFL allows the flexibility and functionality that gives these community spaces life. With its affordable, attractive, and low-maintenance choices – in an array of design options – TFL can be the cornerstone of places where groups come together for work, play, and home life.

Arclin TFL - Community Designs

Sustainable Function for All Community Members

Creating community living and working spaces is a challenging venture. But it is one well worth the time and resources invested. Of primary concern is whether the spaces truly accommodate all community members. The emphasis must be on creating a “place,” and not simply rendering a design. These spaces need to allow residents and workers – all with unique needs and abilities – to pursue their goals and live their lives in a safe, comfortable, and inviting environment. Workspaces must facilitate collaboration between a variety of team members, while homes must accommodate family members of all ages and capabilities.

At the same time, community-focused design and place-making must be mindful of consumers’ continuing commitment to sustainable design and materials. Green architecture principles and advances in environmentally friendly materials mean that community members need not choose between being environmentally conscious and having attractive living and working spaces.

The Role of Community in Design and TFL

Arclin TFL - Community Design - Iconic Walnut Design

Arclin TFL is an ideal choice for community-centric design projects, with beautiful, functional materials that can anchor spaces that suit all family, work, and social group members. TFL is easy to clean; has the natural, organic look that is so popular with consumers now; offers an environmentally friendly alternative to other surfaces; and has a variety of available design options. For instance, Arclin’s new-for-2019 Harvest Collection offers elements of trendy Scandinavian design, wood grains, and both warm and cool color palettes. Arclin also has options from residential to retail, supporting all of the communities important to you and your clients. Contact us today to learn more.

Ten Technical Decorative Surfaces Terms You Need to Know

Every industry has its “lingo” and it is no different when it comes to decorative overlays. If you’ve scrolled through the Arclin website and come across terms that have left you a little puzzled, don’t worry. Here are our top ten TFL terms we think you should know!

  1. TFL – Thermally Fused Laminates. TFL is a durable, high-performing and consistent surface product that is less expensive than veneers and HPL (see below). TFL is made by fusing resin soaked decorative paper directly to a substrate. It is ideal for a wide variety of products and environments. TFL also complements HPL, and the same or compatible designs are typically available in both laminates. While veneers have been around since ancient Egyptian times, they certainly have come a long way.
  2. HPL – High Pressure Laminates. Similar to TFL, HPL also provide a durable surface overlay. However, HPL is traditionally used for extreme-traffic surfaces and are produced by saturating multiple layers of craft paper with phenolic resin. A layer of printed décor paper is placed on top of the multiple layers of kraft paper before pressing and fusing the paper with a substrate. 
  3. Overlay – a covering for a material’s surface. TFL and HPL are examples of decorative overlays.
  4. Substrate – refers to an underlying material on which paper or other materials are applied. In the decorative overlays industry, we may classify particleboard or plywood as substrates.
  5. Thermoset –  a material, commonly a resin or synthetic plastic, that hardens after the application of heat and pressure.
  6. Fidelity – the level of accuracy with which something is replicated. In the decorative overlays industry, this term may be used to describe how well TFL or other overlays mimic the look or texture of specific materials, like wood or marble.
  7. Veneer – a thin decorative layer of material applied to a substrate. Veneers can offer the look of highly sought after materials at a lower cost. Check out our post Alternative Building Materials That Create a Luxury Look Without a Luxe Price for a deeper look at this.
  8. Grain – the longitudinal arrangement or pattern of fibers in wood, paper, etc. TFL, especially textured TFL, can mimic the look of real wood grains.
  9. Sustainable – conserving an ecological balance by avoiding depletion of natural resources. In construction, this means that steps have been taken to reduce the carbon footprint of the building or furniture while using materials that do not deplete natural resources.
  10. Low-Emission – Materials such as paint and adhesives contain volatile organic compounds, or VOCs. VOC’s unique properties allow the material to evaporate so paints dry and leave pigment behind, or adhesives dry and bond materials together. However, it is not recommended to be exposed to VOCs too often. Low-emission material, such as TFL, are designed to emit low or no VOCs — making for a very environmentally healthy application (also Shades of Green). Low-emission building material can help achieve LEED certification and are, in general, just healthier for the people around it!

Are there other technical terms in the world of TFL? Post a comment with your questions on our Facebook page.

 

Alternative Building Materials That Create a Luxury Look Without a Luxe Price

Marble, granite, steel, teakwood, and mahogany all are expensive to use, especially if covering a large space. But you don’t have to spend a lot to get a luxury look today. Engineered building materials are not only up to 70% less expensive than the real deal, but are often more durable. And because many use renewable sources or recycled materials, they tend to also be more eco-friendly. The result is easier maintenance and longer life of a building. What’s not to like about that?

Here are some materials that can give an elegant look for less.

1. TFL 

Alternative Building Materials TFL - Arclin TFLDesign-forward, versatile, and environmentally-friendly, TFL can match the graphic intensity and fidelity of woods, stone, metals, and abstracts without the price tag of the real thing. This resin-coated sheet of décor paper is directly applied to a substrate, such as particleboard or plywood to create a cost-effective material to build furniture, shelves and to cover walls. And now that textures are available, the options are endless.

2. Stone Veneer

Alternative Building Materials - Stone Veneer - Arclin TFLComing in a 50-60% less cost than real stone, manufactured stone veneer is an attractive option to get a stone look for fireplaces and building exteriors without the weight and construction requirements of real stone. Plus, it comes in a much wider variety of designs and colors. Since it is typically thinner than real stone, the veneer version needs less building materials to adhere it to the wall frame, making it easier and less expensive to build.

3. Bamboo

Bamboo Construction - Alternative Building Materials - Arclin TFLBamboo may seem like an acquired taste but it is actually a sustainable choice for framing buildings. It is fast-growing, lightweight, and can replace steel rebar and concrete in construction. While used for years in areas native to bamboo — think warm, humid climates — conventional construction is beginning to see the benefits.

4. Engineered Marble

Engineered Marble - Alternative Building Materials - Arclin TFLEngineered marble is just as tough (some say even tougher) and wears just as well as real marble. A composite material made of crushed stone bound together by a polymer resin or cement mix, it can give a luxe look to large buildings such as malls, hotels, and department stores. Because so much stone is required to cover the large walls and floors, it is a good choice to keep costs down.

What alternative materials are you using in your new building projects? Share with us on our Facebook page.

Clean & Green: Trends in Hospital Design

The game is changing when it comes to hospital design. Designers and architects are more in tune than ever about how integral design choices are for patient wellbeing. Hospitals all around the country are taking steps in a new direction by cultivating a positive atmosphere through intentional design — and we’re all for it! Here are a few trends hospitals are using to soften the sterile look of traditional facilities.

Brighten It Up

hospital design Trends Arclin TFLOut with the greys and blue, in with the light and bright. We are seeing hospital design replace traditional, more conservative tones with brighter swashes of colors as accent walls in patient rooms, common spaces, and even often-overlooked hallways. Arclin’s Angkor Root or Kinabalu Teak are two choice ideal for creating a clean, modern backdrop to whatever bright color a hospital chooses.

Green Friendly

Hospitals are going green and seeing results. Not only are they using more sustainable material like TFL because of its durability, germ-resistance, and zero-emissions, but they can reduce costs by using more TFL in more places. From furniture to built-ins, wall-coverings to shelving, the TFL can create a clean, consistent space that has minimal impact on the environment and is sensitive to patient needs.

Home Away From Home

Hospitals require a certain level of clinical functionality. However, creating an at-home feel can increase patient satisfaction by making design choices that result in reduced environmental stressors. This is being done through softer linens in sophisticated colors, sturdier and matching in-room furniture such as wardrobes and bedside tables, and accenting patient rooms with greenery and artwork. By creating a more residential feel, patients have a more positive experience.

Comfort in Chaos

Texture is showing up everywhere in commercial design right now, and hospitals are finally coming on board. While a clean and crisp style has always been a go-to in hospital design, we’re seeing warmth created by adding wood patterns to wall design, lighting fixtures, and ceiling coverings. In the high-stress environment of a hospital, texture can help create a more relaxed, comfortable environment.

The Right Surface for the Right Space

Let’s show them how TFL works!

You know it, we know it — TFL is one of the most versatile decorative surface options available in the market today. High performing, design-forward, versatile, cost effective and environmentally safe. And perfect for a wide variety of environments and applications.

Arclin is creating tools to help all of us in the TFL value chain. Tools that can help educate your customers and theirs by demonstrating the attributes and benefits of the product in a wide variety of applications. We’re creating an online gallery to showcase thermally fused laminates in their natural habitats. And that is, virtually everywhere. Share photos, ideas, customer applications…anything you think will help us, together, bring more people to the TFL table.


retail TFLRETAIL

Dark to light, traditional to contemporary, wood grains to abstracts, TFL fits any retail environment, any brand on store fixtures, shelving, POP displays, closets, walls and counters.

What’s your favorite retail application? Share it with us and we’ll share with the industry!


office TFLOFFICE

The perfect office combines durability and design. Just like TFL. For desks, cabinets, shelving, credenzas and walls.

What new applications are you seeing in the office industry for TFL? Is it in designs? Applications? Textures?


healthcare TFLHEALTHCARE

Designs made to heal. Germ-resistant surfaces. Zero-emitting panels. Use it on workstations, lockers, cabinets and furniture, in waiting areas, workspaces and patient rooms.

We’re seeing a lot more creativity in healthcare environments, as the market gets more competitive and designers are looking for design-forward and healthy surfaces. What trends do you see driving TFL use in healthcare? Can you give us an example?


hospitality TFLHOSPITALITY

On trend and in budget. TFL adorns walls, furniture, fixtures and more in hotels, restaurants and clubs around the world.

Restaurants and hotels are more and more becoming havens and drivers of design versus merely places for comfort and sustenance. Where do you see opportunities to integrate TFL that maybe even the industry isn’t thinking of yet?


education TFLEDUCATION

The smart solution — TFL is durable and easy to clean and comes in designs and colors suited for any educational environment. For furniture (classroom, library, dorm), closets and desks.

Budgets are often among the biggest drivers in building materials decisions for educational spaces. But we know you can get a hot new TFL for no more investment than the same old, same old. What designs do you see showing potential in education? Traditional woods? Lineals? Reclaimed materials-inspired?


residential TFLRESIDENTIAL

Durable, stain resistant and available in a wide variety of designs — from wood grains to abstracts, solid colors and more — TFL is ideal for kitchens, cabinets, closets, organizational systems, furniture, garages…even the man cave.

We’re excited about what we’re seeing in residential interiors. Because we’re seeing a little bit of everything! Show us your favorites — a photo, a link…an example of something you’re finding in the market.

TFL - Environmentally Friendly Building Products

TFL: Countless Shades of Green

Environmentally friendly building products

In our building industry travels, we’ll sometimes hear push-back against the use of any type of wood-related products — from specifiers and buyers rightfully charged with finding the most environmentally responsible building products available for their interiors projects. We couldn’t agree more that the careful use of our natural resources is the responsibility of everyone in the design and build industries. The truth is, Thermally Fused Laminates, or TFL, are one of the smartest environmentally responsible building products and can be used in a wide variety of applications, from furniture and fixtures to architectural features, closets and cabinets.

What makes it green?

  1. Quite simply, wood use has evolved. For many applications, we’ve moved from using solid woods (and cutting down lots of old-growth trees) to an environmentally preferable substrate with veneer to, now, a substrate with a decorate surface overlay that enables us to mimic all the design properties of real wood but is made with papers derived from tree fibers grown on controlled, fast-growing plantations. TFL spares old growth and exotic woods while capturing all of its graphic qualities. Read more about the evolution of wood.
  2. We’re certified (not to be confused with certifiable). Arclin TFL is manufactured in FSC® chain of custody-certified facilities. Panels made with Arclin TFL are ultra low-emitting and may contribute to LEED EQ Credit 4.4 for improved air quality. And Arclin applies its own E-Gen® designation to its TFL products, a proprietary designation that it applies only to products expressly engineered for exceptional product performance and to reduce manufacturing and downstream environmental impact.
  3. Arclin also manufactures low- to zero-emitting resins for wood panels. Those substrate panels can be combined with Arclin TFL for an extra layer of…green.

Compare TFL to solid woods, veneers, plastics, concrete and more to discover the right shade of green for your next project.