Design Rules for Matching Wood Surfaces

A time-honored classic in a range of design environments, the popularity of wood surfaces continues. With the versatility to fit into any decorating scheme, from traditional and rustic to minimal and modern, wood is an ideal choice. But how do you go about mixing different wood elements in your design schemes? Learn more about the design rules for matching wood surfaces and view a few of Arclin TFL’s wood finish options.

Warm Up; Be Cool When Matching Wood Surfaces

Creating a beautiful wood-based design does not require that all wood surfaces match; in fact, the visual interest that comes with mixing different kinds of wood in a space it part of the appeal. However, you can find some guidance by considering each wood’s undertone: is it warm or cool? Warm woods appear red, orange, or yellow (like Arclin’s Alabama Cherry), while cool woods look gray (check out Charles Bridge). Keeping all wood pieces in a space in the same undertone family can create a unified look. If in doubt, you can focus primarily on a beige-toned wood (such as Kinabalu Teak), which has a neutral undertone and will complement either warm or cool counterparts.

Design Rules for Matching Wood Surfaces

“Common” Sense in Matching Wood Surfaces

Ensuring that your wood elements have something in common will also tie your design together. Again: this doesn’t mean everything needs to match – just that the pieces share a theme. For instance, you might focus on wood pieces with strong, clean lines in a modern design scheme; or, you might consider working in pieces with a similar finish (e.g., woodgrain patterns like those in pine and oak). Applying this tactic along with the color considerations noted above will set you up for a space that is visually congruent, without being boring.

Design Rules for Matching Wood Surfaces

In with the New…and the Old

Most spaces evolve over time – particularly in residential settings. This means that pieces are added as needed and materials are not purchased and placed together. This creates a wonderful sense of history, as older pieces are mixed with newer in ways that reflect the occupants’ changing circumstances and tastes. Like The Spruce recommends, so long as you bear in mind tenets of keeping elements complementary, the charm of bringing together pieces from different eras can outweigh the benefits of consistency.

If you’re looking to integrate wood surfaces into your next design project, Arclin TFL is the place to start. Like all of our surfaces, wood-look TFL is durable, high-performing, low maintenance, and an environmentally friendly option. Contact us today to find out more.

There’s Nothing Boring About Neutral

When you think of neutral colors, you might picture bland, unimaginative spaces with little style or character. However, when done right, neutrals offer a range of decorative possibilities. Using a neutral base such as white, off-white, grey, or taupe can connect with your living space, create continuity, and serve as an ideal backdrop for colorful furniture or accent pieces. See which Arclin TFL designs pair excellently with your neutral palette.

Why Neutrals?

Neutral Colors in Interior Design

The beauty of neutrals are in their versatility. First, neutrals themselves have come a long way since the days when beige and cream were the only options. Now, ivory, taupe, grey, and others come in an array of shade and tone options that make them a lovely standalone choice. You might consider layering different versions of the same neutral color to give a room a peaceful, yet pulled-together look. Second, neutrals are perfect for staging other design elements, such as boldly patterned furniture or colorful art.

Neutral Shades and TFL

Neutral colors like sand shoal
Arclin’s large, versatile color collection ensures you’ll find the neutral tone (or tones) perfect for your design project. Classic colors like Antique White and Porcelain are beautiful, soothing base colors for any room and can serve as the primary color schemes in an overall neutral look.

With Arclin design overlays for TFL, you can also step your neutral game up by incorporating eye-catching textures to add visual appeal to your palette. For example, wood grain patterns in neutral colors like Sand Shoal bring an organic, natural feel to your space. Arclin also plays on the popularity of greys in neutral color schemes, with the stone-like look of Skyline Dusk.

And, as always, choosing Arclin design overlays for TFL means high performance at a lower cost than similar products and an environmentally-friendly option that protects natural resources and supports improved indoor air quality.

Pop with TFL

neutral colors in design
As noted above, neutrals can stand alone, or can serve as a great background to add color through accents. While furniture, art, and decorative pieces can fulfill this purpose, keep in mind that TFL is also available in a number of bold colors to bring pizazz to your design schemes. An option like Navajo Red will draw the eye in any setting. You can also browse Arclin’s design collections, to see how TFL can be integrated into projects by visiting arclintfl.com.

No matter how you stage your neutrals, Arclin TFL is a solid choice. Contact us today to learn more.

Trends From The Furniture Industry

Designing retail, residential, hospitality, healthcare, and office spaces is a “whole picture” endeavor. Designers need to be aware not only of the nature of the spaces they plan, but also what will fill those spaces. Keeping up with the latest trends in the furniture industry will help you as you plan and execute your designs. Let’s take a look at what is currently happening in the furniture market, and what may be coming up in the near future.

An Industry on the Rise

Arclin-Furniture Industry Rise
Globally, the furniture market has a predicted growth of 5.2% through 2023, driven primarily by increased purchases by millennial customers and ease of purchase from online platforms. Buyers are also increasingly drawn to multi-functional furniture that can serve several purposes (like daily use and storage) in space-saving packages. Finally, luxury furniture design is enjoying more popularity, as customers are demonstrating a willingness to pay more for high-quality goods.

Furniture Design & Ecommerce

Arclin-Online Furniture Shopping

As with many consumer goods, online shopping for furniture continues to grow in popularity. Tech-savvy millennial customers are driving this trend. But other customer segments are also increasingly willing to buy outside of brick and mortar locations. In addition to dedicated online retailers, retail locations that maintain physical locations are attempting to capitalize on virtual shopping, with some offering same day pick-up at their stores of items purchased online. Incentives like free delivery and installation are also driving the competitive market of online furniture sales. Online “influencers” (those with large social media followings) are also advancing the market, encouraging their followers to replicate their décor styles by promoting certain brands.

Multi-functional Furniture

Multi-Functional Furniture, Modular Furniture
Consumers want their furniture design to serve multiple purposes. As more and more employees are working from home, residential furniture must also serve as part-time office pieces. Many retailers are also integrating technology with their offerings – furniture with built-in charging stations are increasingly sought after in home and public spaces. Multi-functionality is also tied to space-saving; as consumers are drawn to smaller, more efficient living spaces, furniture that can be used in various ways and is portable (or even foldable) is desirable.

Demand for Luxury

Luxury Furniture
As domestic and global economies continue to recover from the recession, consumers are finding themselves with more disposable income, and luxury furniture purchases have increased. As noted above, more buyers are finding themselves drawn to social media influencers, many of whom advertise higher-end brands and materials. Premium wood pieces (e.g., mahogany), along with leather, glass, and metal designs are gaining popularity. At the same time, consumers remain cognizant of the environmental impact of their purchases, and more furniture manufacturers are assuring their customers of eco-friendly materials and responsible practices. Those who can provide the “sweet spot” of style and sustainability are poised for profit.

Arclin design overlays for TFL are the perfect backdrop or complement to any furniture choice. Our environmentally-friendly products provide easy maintenance that makes them at home in any space and our broad range of palettes ensures TFL fits beautifully in luxury-minded designs. Contact us today to learn more about how we can help with your upcoming design projects.

TFL Before and After: Hospitality Spaces

TFL in Hospitality

TFL, Hotel Room, Hospitality

The hospitality industry has, in the last decade, demonstrated continuing recovery from the Recession of the late 2000s. From 2009-2017, U.S. hotel bookings grew from $116 billion to $185 billion, while other sectors, such as restaurants, showed associated growth. At the same time, U.S. venues face increasing competition from international counterparts, making the drive to improve on infrastructure and amenities more and more essential.

From better lobby experiences to sleeker interiors, hospitality locations are evolving so they may bring more guests in, and keep them in their venues longer. Learn how Arclin’s decorative overlays for TFL can help make your hotel or food service location a friendlier, more profitable space.  

Design an Experience, Not Just a Space

common area tfl, Hospitality

Players in the hospitality industry face unique challenges – among them, the diverse range of stakeholders served and the growing expectations of these guests. While the physical elements of the places these consumers occupy are critical, “It’s also about designing an experience that flows,” says WATG|Wimberly Interiors, a hospitality design firm. Hoteliers are moving away from traditional, generic designs and toward an optimized visitor experience. For instance, a “blurring” between home experiences and hotel experiences, with more relaxed, yet stylish designs, are gaining popularity. Extended-stay hotels are increasingly mimicking home-like amenities, with emphasis on separate guest and visitor spaces and upgraded kitchen and bathroom facilities.

TFL, with its ability to serve as the foundation for any room, can set the stage for high-quality hotel stays. Equally at home in kitchen, bathroom, and living settings, TFL is the durable, functional option around which to build rooms and suites. In addition to being long-lasting, easy to clean, and maintain, TFL’s vast array of style options allows you to take your guest experience anywhere it needs to go.

Convenience Without Compromise: Restaurant Design Trends

TFL, Restaurant, social setting, design

Guests are seeking more from the locations they patronize – restaurants, cafes, and other food service locations are increasingly serving as spots for food, socialization, and work. Spaces are shifting to accommodate distance workers and telecommuters – those who are conducting business from home or alternative locations. This also includes those undertaking multiple roles (such as student and employee) from a single venue.

On one hand, this has placed a premium on an open concept, adaptable layouts that can accommodate these varied needs. At the same time, incorporating touches of elegance into design and offerings is also appreciated and rewarded by guests. For example, fine dining establishments are exploring ways to provide quality food experiences at lower price points, with associated shifts in design. Cafes and other venues associated with higher-dollar parent establishments are enjoying strong growth.

TFL, with its capacity to adapt to any sort of hospitality space you can envision, has you covered for walls, fixtures, and more. At once practical and elegant, it’s perfectly suited to restaurants-as-workspaces, those trying to achieve casual glamour, and anything in between. Contact Arclin to discuss possible design options, or with any questions you might have.

TFL Before and After: Kitchens

TFL in Kitchen Designs

Arclin TFL - Kitchen Before & After, TFL in Kitchen Designs

Kitchens are often described as the hearts of homes. Not only are family meals prepared in these spaces – they often seem to end up as a central gathering place for friends and visitors. Modern kitchens have to support traditional food preparation and storage, but also offer style that accommodates their roles as a hangout. Kitchen design is also a vital component of a home’s resale value, with potential buyers often drawn to these areas before any others. Redesigning or remodeling kitchens for maximum style and substance is a sound investment.

Arclin TFL can be the centerpiece of kitchen design, with its mix of attractive styling and functional attributes. TFL in kitchen designs is beautiful yet practical – a perfect mantra for kitchens themselves.

Beyond Basics

All-white kitchens have enjoyed popularity for several years, but color is making a comeback. In fact, colors that pop are used as the foundation of the room. We’re seeing them in countertops and cabinetry – or as accents, creating eye-catching spaces as notable for their design as for their function. As stainless steel remains the appliance material of choice, homeowners and builders can take liberties with bold color palettes without fear of clashing.

TFL designs are available in an array of colors – whether designers or homeowners are interested in exploring bold reds, sunny yellows, or striking metallics. Designing (or re-designing) a kitchen with TFL allows for colorful expression.

Arclin TFL - TFL in Kitchen Designs

Kitchen Glamor

Kitchens are traditionally defined (and designed) by their purpose: practical spaces to store and prepare food. But, contemporary kitchens are getting glamorous makeovers, with fixtures and accents that may seem more at home in a living area.

This style also lends itself to a mix of finishes that add visual interest. TFL, with options that include woodgrains, brushed surfaces, and matte looks, is a perfect choice

Unexpected Surfaces

Kitchen materials – especially those used in countertops – are continuing to evolve. As granite’s countertop dominance may be waning, designers and residents are looking for stylish, functional new options. They want a range of decorative choices and the practical qualities necessary for food preparation.

TFL in kitchen designs marry form and function. Its beautiful design is bolstered by its durable, hygienic properties, making it the perfect material for stylish spaces that create and support healthy cooking conditions. TFL in kitchen designs are also a great choice for cabinetry, creating surfaces that are easy to clean and appealing to the eye.

Contact Arclin to see how TFL can best fit into your kitchen design projects.

Unexpected Surfaces in Kitchen Design - Arclin TFL - TFL in Kitchen Designs

 

Mixing Metals with TFL

A hallmark of design in 2019 is integrating unexpected materials into familiar spaces. One trend we are excited to embrace is how designers are mixing metals in both home and office spaces. Brass, gold –and especially rose gold – have become popular staples when considering décor or furniture pieces.

Read more to see how this trends pairs with Arclin decorative overlays for TFL, which provide interesting and attractive complements and/or contrasts to metallics.

Go for the Glow with Brass and Gold

Arclin TFL - Mixing Metals

Warm metals are making a comeback, showing up in spaces in which stainless steel and chrome have dominated. They can bring to living and working environments a traditional, nostalgic ambience that may feel more inviting than cooler colors.

Typically, brass has been presented in a highly polished finish, but burnished, matte, and un-lacquered pieces are popular now. Pieces such as lighting fixtures and cabinetry accents are being updated with clean lines and modern forms, making this traditional metal feel contemporary. From mantles to stove hoods to office accent pieces, brass is showing up in a variety of settings.

Similarly, gold is being used in spaces from bedrooms to boardrooms. The metal’s glamour and reflective qualities make it a stunning vehicle for accent pieces, adding visual interest to any room. Gold also mixes well with other current design trends, serving as a contrast to bold, graphic styles and a complement to other organic backdrops and pieces.

TFL sets the stage for these bold metals. Arclin’s new designs for our Harvest Collection offers outstanding choices to mix with brass and gold. The warm, natural look of Atlas Cedar blends perfectly with these metals. Or, create a stunning contrast with the cooler tones of Ionic Walnut. Designers may also want to capitalize on trends of mixing metals, using TFL’s metallic options to layer these colors.

Everything is Rosy with Rose Gold

Arclin TFL Rose Gold - Mixing Metals

From smartphones to jewelry to car accessories, rose gold continues to enjoy popularity in contemporary design. Pink-toned, rich, yet neutral, rose gold communicates luxury without being overly extravagant. Not quite shiny, yet not quite muted, rose gold’s versatility is part of its draw. The metal is being incorporated into public spaces to create a sense of warmth and style, and into homes through pieces from furniture fabrics to wood finishes. Further, the popularity of rose gold has sparked interest in other pink-toned colors and muted metals.

TFL designs are the perfect partner for rose gold, whether in home or commercial settings. Warmer options like Atlas Cedar (another addition to the new-for-2019 Harvest Collection) bring out the cozier, comforting aspects of rose gold. Or, create contrast with cooler options such as Charles Bridge.

However you choose to incorporate TFL designs with metallic elements, rest assured that the durability and ease of maintenance of Arclin’s decorative overlays for TFL will keep your spaces looking beautiful. Contact Arclin for more design ideas, or with any questions you might have.

Kitchen Trends — Fresh Perspective

Arclin takes a walk through KBIS 2019…and sees some welcome shifts

Grays, rustics, Shaker-style cabinets. If we had to sum up the last several years in kitchen trends in just a few words, that’s where we’d probably land.

So we were heartened (and not a little bit excited) to see some newer approaches emerging at this year’s Kitchen & Bath Industry Show (KBIS) in Las Vegas last month. Don’t get us wrong…there’s still plenty of gray. And as one Southeastern U.S. builder confirmed for us, “Shaker, Shaker, Shaker, white, white, white — that’s what most of our customers are (still!) demanding.” But we do see some welcome shifts. To name a few…

Sleek & Sophisticated

Ooo, la, la, we like this trend. What we might’ve once deemed “European,” is now simply high style on parade. Clean, sleek lines. Modern, minimalist hardware. Often-dark overtones (some got downright moody). We wouldn’t want to show up for dinner in our sweats in these elegant kitchens!

The nice thing about this trend, especially for those of us in the surfaces business, is that it mixes equal parts solids and wood grains. White, gray or even black solids, often with luxurious finishes like smooth matte or high gloss, combine with gorgeous woods. And while “real” wood will always have a place in luxury homes, engineered surfaces have reached such a level of sophistication — with high fidelity designs and deep, realistic textures — they’re finding their way into high end interiors where sleek and European make them not just cost-effective but design-imperative.

Natural Materials, Engineered Style

Continuing the sophistication theme, we saw a lot of luxury metals — silver and gold — integrated into tile patterns, especially.

Dramatic metals and stone patterns, too, were taking center stage as focal points (think fireplace surrounds and large architectural panels). Sometimes the real thing, often an engineered alternative, these accents were everywhere. And stone wasn’t just marble or granite this time, but included a mix of other creative patterns and structures.

(Asks nearby colleague: does this go here?) We also love, love, love the dramatic introduction of burnt wood accents and features, called shou sugi ban, a Japanese finishing technique. This look, too, was found on “real” materials and is also being captured on engineered surfaces like TFL (thermally fused laminates). Dark, texture-rich and attention getting, it makes for a real conversation piece.

Kitchen Trends, KBIS, Natural Materials, Engineered Style

Kitchen Trends, KBIS, Natural Materials, Engineered Style

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Silver and gold heighten the elegance factor.

Pops

White still dominates, but is being complemented — whether in Shaker, sleek or traditional interiors — with pops of, well, lots of things.

Pops of color. Blue remains the solid color accent du jour. (And we got into a rather lengthy debate over what you’d call the most ubiquitous blue in the current modern kitchen. We settled on somewhere between royal blue and cobalt.)

Pops of wood. The last couple of years, we’ve seen combos of wood grain lower cabinets and white on top. This trend continues but wood is also making more distinctive appearances in white kitchens and baths with one dramatic accent, like a raw wood inset on a countertop or backsplash, or a single exotic wood wall.

Pops of drama. We captured this above, but worth noting here too, as kitchens are clearly taking center stage in new ways.

Kitchen Trends, KBIS, Pops of wood, wood accent

Kitchen Trends, KBIS, Pops of wood, wood accent

Sleek white cabinets with pops of wood. The raw, natural island inset provides a stunning contrast.

Au Naturale

Wood grain surfaces are lightening up. We’re not talking about simply a head back toward the light maples and birches of yore. Even still-popular walnut grains are showing up in their near-natural state. It’s a simple move but one that makes a world of difference, as the wood grain and color, themselves, become the focus, rather than simply the color of the stain.

We’re seeing this as the natural evolution of the rustics trend. Still natural — even raw — but also elegant and sophisticated.

We can tell you from an engineered surfaces perspective that white was, is and will likely remain king of the kitchen, bath and closet. And grays are still maintaining their reign as queen. What we’re seeing now in all of these trends is a way to work other features — grains, textures, metals and more — in and among them. There are definitely some new things to talk about this year.

Kitchen Trends, KBIS, natural materials

 

 Natural materials (or likenesses thereof) provide dramatic relief to equally dramatic solids.

Planning Your Architectural Projects for the New Year: Incorporating Energy & Health

In recent years, it has become hard not to come across the word sustainability in both professional and personal life. For those of you in the architecture and interior design business, you likely hear this word daily. And there is good reason for that. Architects especially have the responsibility and opportunity to bring sustainable solutions to market for both the planet and the people inhabiting the spaces they create.

Since 2013, the American Institute of Architects’ (AIA) has touted their report “Sustainability Leadership Opportunity Scan,” which cites an interesting trend: physical spaces are connected to energy and health. Architectural innovation in these areas has a chance to both serve the best interest of those who occupy buildings, and the environmental settings in which the buildings are staged.

Incorporating Arclin TFL into design plans addresses both of these components of innovative, high-quality architecture. With its environmentally friendly, health conscious design and production, TFL is an excellent choice for architects seeking to make a positive impact.

Sustainability in Building Materials - Arclin TFL in Hotels

Energy Sustainability

The field of architecture is increasingly tasked with being mindful not only of the physical elements of design, but also its environmental effects. For example, rating systems such as LEED and regulations like the International Green Construction Code are taking into account performance aspects of design. Whether architects are asked to improve existing structures or are creating something completely new, TFL can be a game-changer.

TFL fulfills the needs of specifiers and buyers looking for responsible building materials. Using TFL in place of wood and wood-related products can be a critical step in creating greener buildings. TFL’s substrate looks like natural surfaces, without the potentially devastating environmental impacts. With its Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) Chain-of-Custody certification, Arclin’s manufacturing facilities are examples of excellence in production. TFL can contribute to LEED EQ Credit 4.4 ratings for improved air quality. Further, Arclin’s proprietary E-Gen® designation is further assurance of exceptional performance with low environmental impact.

Sustainability in Building Materials - Arclin TFL

Healthy Living

Architecture also plays a vital role in ensuring built environments are productive partners in addressing health and wellness concerns for those who occupy them. Whether it is being mindful of public health concerns in commercial buildings or personal wellness in residential sectors, TFL is a smart option for architects.

Some of the elements that make TFL environmentally sound – such as zero-emitting panels – are also a boon in regard to health. Its germ-resistant surfaces and ease of maintenance and cleaning also contribute on this front. While all TFL products are exceptional choices when keeping in mind occupants’ and residents’ health, some overlays are available with Greenguard certification, further enhancing its protective qualities. Further, none of TFL’s health benefits need supersede its aesthetic appeal – whether in public or private design settings, attractive design elements are guaranteed.

Sustainable building materials - Arclin TFL in office lobby

If you are interested in further exploring how Arclin TFL might play into your upcoming architectural projects, please contact us for more information.

TFL Before and After: Education

As theories of design continue to evolve, it is undeniable that we are increasingly guided by the idea that the spaces in which we conduct our lives not only provide a stage for our activities, but can have a significant impact on the success of those activities. One arena where this notion is receiving particular attention is in the education sector. No longer do we subscribe to a model of schools with standardized, unimaginative classrooms and campus layouts. Instead, we move toward designs that provide greater learning and teaching options for students and instructors, embrace environmental consciousness, and support inspiring sensory experiences.

Arclin TFL can be the foundation of transformations for educational environments. With its functional, multi-use character, green sourcing, and design-forward options, TFL is the choice for building better schools.

Learning In (and Out) of the Classroom

Arclin TFL - Before & After TFL in Education

One of the most important changes in contemporary educational curricula is the idea that learning can – and should – happen in a variety of environments. E-learning technologies allow classes to be held practically anywhere, and more administrators and instructors are seeking ways to take students out of the confines of the traditional classroom. Open space learning environments, mock clinical settings, and building designs that transition seamlessly between indoor and outdoor areas are gaining traction in forward-thinking educational design.

TFL, with its durability, hygienic qualities, and wide range of applications, can accommodate the needs of these varied learning spaces. TFL designs are at home in office, healthcare, high-traffic, and residential spaces – all of which are applicable in new takes on educational architecture.

Green Learning

Arclin TFL - Before & After TFL in Education

Sustainability is a watchword for all aspects of contemporary life, and bringing tenants of environmentalism into classrooms is vital. Educational settings from preschools to universities are committing to campaigns such as enhanced recycling programs and community gardening, but the materials used to build learning spaces are also drawing more scrutiny.

Using TFL is an ideal way to make educational building environmentally conscious, from the ground up. Able to replicate the look of natural materials without depleting natural resources, TFL is manufactured in certified facilities, guaranteeing its responsible sourcing. TFL can also help in the LEED accreditation process, earning facilities greed building ratings. TFL can contribute to a healthier learning environment, both for those occupying the spaces, and the larger environments in which they are placed.

Inspiring Design

Arclin TFL - After Photo in University Collaboration Rooms

While functionality will always be a hallmark of educational design, gone are cookie cutter classrooms that are impossible to distinguish from one another. Instead, practical, serviceable spaces are being augmented with materials and colors meant to spark students’ and teachers’ creativity. Using spaces as a backdrop for exploration by providing multiple ways to learn in a single space, and by imbuing these spaces with stimulating materials is changing the way learning is leveraged.

Once again, Arclin TFL is up to the task. With an incredible array of choices in colors and finishes, we lay the foundation for exciting educational environments.

Ten Modern Interior Design Trends for 2019

Does the new year have you gazing around your home, office, or place of business, seeking a change of scenery? You’re not alone: from colors and patterns to furniture and fixtures, the leading minds in design are weighing in on what will be trendy in interior design in 2019.

Arclin TFL can serve as the foundation for any of the following suggestions. With its functionality, beauty, and easy maintenance, TFL is the ideal start for a new view in your home, office, or commercial location. Contact us today to learn more.

1. Boho Chic

The fun, whimsical, hippie-inspired look of Boho fashion has returned for home design in 2019. Still laid-back and relaxed, modern boho also incorporates rich colors and textures that keep the style fresh and interesting. Think leather, clean lined furniture and tighter color palettes paired with hand-painted tiles, vintage textiles and bold wallpaper.

Modern Boho Chic Room - Arclin TFL - Design Trends 2019

2. Stylish & Sustainable

Sustainability and mindfulness – both in materials and design – remains relevant this year. Consumers have a continuing commitment to examining the source of their design elements, their environmental impact, and the purpose of each piece they incorporate. This includes creating a thoughtful, environmentally-conscious foundation on which to stage other pieces – a perfect role for TFL.

Sustainable Design - Arclin TFL - 2019 Trends

3. Artisanal Accents

Handcrafted pieces (and those that look handcrafted) are extremely popular. This trend is particularly appealing to decorators who seek to use relatively few pieces to customize an otherwise minimalistic space. An increasing interest in patronizing local artisans and vendors also drives interest in artisanal décor; a local farmers and crafters market can be an excellent source of unique options, close to home.

Artisanal Accents - Arclin TFL - 2019 Design Trends

4. Varied Colors and Palettes

This is a great year to express yourself through color, with a wide range of choices currently trending. From pastels to terracotta to various shades of gray, fresh looks on old favorites are revitalizing interiors of both homes and commercial settings. Vibrant greens are also big right now, given their eye-catching, but soothing qualities. Arclin TFL, with its vast array of color options has you covered.

Varied Colors and Palettes - Arclin TFL - 2019 Design Trends

5. Multi-Functional Spaces

As we’ve noted before, more people are seeking living and working spaces that can accommodate a variety of people, tasks, and needs. Consumers are demonstrating a growing interest in multi-use furniture (the Murphy Bed is making a comeback!) and in living/working areas that can do double duty.

Multifunctional Spaces - 2019 Design Trends - Arclin TFL

6. Hygge

Hygge, a Scandinavian concept of comfort and coziness, is continuing to gain visibility in 2019 – especially in those regions dealing with cold winter weather. While this may bring to mind chunky sweaters and curling up under blankets, modern hygge interior design seeks to blend soft luxury with functionality. By keeping an eye to comfort in everything from colors to fabrics to furniture shape, hygge design creates cozy spaces that are still workable and attractive.

Hygge - 2019 Design Trends - Arclin TFL

7. Natural Finishes

Materials made from, or that look like, stone and wood are being used for their organic feel. Creating a perfect backdrop for any design motif and accessories, these materials set the stage for a spectrum of interior options. Arclin’s woodgrains and stone options are a perfect fit for this trend.

Natural Finishes - Design Trends Arclin TFL

8. Bold Kitchens

Kitchens dominated by clean lines, white backdrops, and lots of stainless steel may be taking a backseat to bolder, more personal preparation and eating spaces. New thoughts in kitchen design seek to use visually compelling accessories and to blend kitchen design more seamlessly with the rest of the home, incorporating textiles and furniture pieces more commonly seen in living spaces.

Bold Kitchens Design Trends - Arclin TFL

9. Plants

While green color palettes are getting a nod in 2019, so too are “real” greens, in the form of decorative houseplants. Regardless of the size or purpose of a space, plants add an organic, natural touch. Consumers can mix trends by potting their plants in artisanal vessels and by incorporating them into less-expected places, such as kitchens.

Plants - Design Trends - Arclin TFL

10. Soft, Ambient Lighting

As more and more workers and homeowners move away from harsh, fluorescent lighting, soft illumination concepts are increasingly sought. Lampshades with opaque glass and design options like lighting rooms from below rather than above are expected to been seen more in 2019.

Ambient Lighting - Design Trends - Arclin TFL

The Role of Community in Design

In an increasingly connected world, community is an expansive concept. It is made broader by the variety of ways in which we now communicate. We are members of multiple communities at any given moment: both in-person and virtually. The importance of community, and a desire to grow and nurture communities is having an impact on design. We increasingly seek places in which we can bring together the people important to us: family, friends, co-workers, and others. To this end, spaces such as community housing, multigenerational homes, and workspaces that facilitate collaboration are growing in popularity.

Arclin TFL allows the flexibility and functionality that gives these community spaces life. With its affordable, attractive, and low-maintenance choices – in an array of design options – TFL can be the cornerstone of places where groups come together for work, play, and home life.

Arclin TFL - Community Designs

Sustainable Function for All Community Members

Creating community living and working spaces is a challenging venture. But it is one well worth the time and resources invested. Of primary concern is whether the spaces truly accommodate all community members. The emphasis must be on creating a “place,” and not simply rendering a design. These spaces need to allow residents and workers – all with unique needs and abilities – to pursue their goals and live their lives in a safe, comfortable, and inviting environment. Workspaces must facilitate collaboration between a variety of team members, while homes must accommodate family members of all ages and capabilities.

At the same time, community-focused design and place-making must be mindful of consumers’ continuing commitment to sustainable design and materials. Green architecture principles and advances in environmentally friendly materials mean that community members need not choose between being environmentally conscious and having attractive living and working spaces.

The Role of Community in Design and TFL

Arclin TFL - Community Design - Iconic Walnut Design

Arclin TFL is an ideal choice for community-centric design projects, with beautiful, functional materials that can anchor spaces that suit all family, work, and social group members. TFL is easy to clean; has the natural, organic look that is so popular with consumers now; offers an environmentally friendly alternative to other surfaces; and has a variety of available design options. For instance, Arclin’s new-for-2019 Harvest Collection offers elements of trendy Scandinavian design, wood grains, and both warm and cool color palettes. Arclin also has options from residential to retail, supporting all of the communities important to you and your clients. Contact us today to learn more.

Mindful Design: TFL in Retail and Hospitality

Contemporary consumers are no longer just looking for great products at affordable prices – they also have a social conscience. Fair trade goods, ethical marketplaces, and even smartphone apps that guide customers toward purchases they can feel good about are increasingly common. Similarly, many shoppers and guests seek to patronize businesses and companies that embrace environmentally friendly practices, including the materials they use in their storefronts and attractions. In fact, industry leaders such as Starbucks are partnering with environmentally-focused organizations to develop and implement best practices for greener business practices. The company is developing a “Greener Stores” program to examine existing and build new locations to reduce its environmental impact and implement mindful design practices.

Mindful Design with TFL

Arclin TFL – which has, in fact, been the material of choice for many retail locations – is a holistic solution for retail and hospitality industries: attractive, low-maintenance, environmentally sound products that support sustainable business operations. Those seeking to stay ahead with practices that show a commitment to the environment, can find solutions with TFL.

Starbucks Mindful Design - Arclin TFLStarbucks Mindful Design - Retail Design with TFL

Conscious Shopping

With Millennials poised to surpass Baby Boomers as the largest population demographic in the U.S. by 2019, the retail and hospitality industries must be prepared to service a new demographic of consumers more likely to be influenced by social concerns in their spending habits. A deeper understanding of what Millennials value as shoppers and visitors is emerging; research is indicating that they choose to support businesses with ethically conscious, environmentally aware practices.

In addition to Millennials, increasing number of consumers of all generations are looking for ways to downsize, minimalize, and adopt lifestyles that reduce environmental impacts. This is an ideal time for companies to explore ways to fall in line with these trends.

Sustainable Options

Arclin TFL covers all bases: stylish design, exceptional performance, and, with materials that mimic the look and feel of natural materials without compromising natural resources, a means to advance green business practices.

TFL is an ideal choice for a variety of retail and hospitality applications: from fixtures to shelving; displays, cabinets, and furniture. Natural-looking woodgrain options are very popular right now. TFL can be a better option than real wood, providing consistency, durability, and cost savings in high traffic customer spaces while still providing the look consumers love. Given improvements in manufacturing technology, TFL can mimic textures and colorations that can be even more attractive than “authentic” wood surfaces.

Arclin’s Retail Design choices provide an array of palette choices and are equally at home in traditional, rustic design schemes, contemporary, abstract settings, and anything in between. Visit our design pages to spark ideas for your unique business needs and mindful design approach.

On-Trend Color Schemes — Right Now

Architects, specifiers, and designers have a lot on their plates. Not only do they need to be concerned with the functionality and logistical aspects of their works, they also need to think about style – including color schemes. Two of the most popular trends for the fall –terracotta/earth tones and monochromatic palettes – are excellent choices, offering the cutting edge of design while maintaining a classic look that can also bridge style trends.

Arclin TFL is an ideal choice for those looking to satisfy customers’ desires for up-to-date styles, while offering long-lasting surfaces that can accommodate long-term use. Let’s take a look at the trends noted above and see how Arclin TFL helps realize these objectives.

Terracotta and Earth Tones

Color Trends - Terracotta -Arclin TFL

Warm, earthy color schemes are extremely popular, whether incorporated in Southwest-inspired design or brought into design themes through accessories. These color themes are generally regarded as calming, yet vibrant, lending themselves to spaces that seem, at once, stable but stimulating. Terracotta and earth tones are also great backdrops for splashes of color such as turquoise and other jewel tones, making them versatile enough to keep fresh by swapping out smaller decorative elements of design.

Arclin TFL offers exceptional options in this theme. Selections such as Cognac and one of our new designs for 2019, Atlas Cedar, provide a strong but soothing red-orange feel complementary of terracotta, while Sandy Creek Maple and Caramel Patina offer a lighter, yet earthy feel.

Monochromatic Color Schemes

Color Trends from Arclin TFL - Noce Blanc

Minimal design is very popular, with commercial and residential spaces alike, adopting the “less is more” mantra. Monochromatic color schemes fit in perfectly – they are easy to create, but not lacking in style. These palettes give commercial spaces a clean yet compelling look, and are a perfect way to highlight a small number of “impact” design elements.

While monochromatic designs can represent any color, shades of white, gray, and silver are particularly popular. Arclin TFL designs such as Noce Blanc, and Brushed Metal are great starting points to explore this theme.

Regardless of current trends, Arclin TFL’s timeless durability, environmentally friendly design, and high functionality means it will remain ready to serve. Visit our design page for more possibilities.

Chic Children’s Spaces

CHIC CHILDREN'S SPACES - Arclin TFL

Children today are more stylish (and style-conscious!) than ever. Pinterest is bursting with boards dedicated to kids’ clothing and accessories, while Instagram showcases some of the world’s hippest young fashionistas. Another great way for chic children to express themselves is in their living spaces – bedrooms and playrooms are getting the style treatment, too.

Kids’ rooms offer great opportunities for fun, whimsical, theme-based design. Arclin TFL provides the perfect palette: our durable, design-forward surfaces set the stage for wherever your imagination (and that of your young design assistant) might take you. Let’s explore a few trends in children’s decorating to get the creative juices flowing.

Chic Children's Bedroom with Stinson Umber - Arclin TFL

Place-Based Design

Most kids have a favorite place – whether this is somewhere down the street or across the globe, you can integrate it into the child’s living space. Zoo-themed rooms, with fun animal prints and representations of their favorite creatures can bring the fun of a trip to the zoo home. A beach bedroom, complete with shell-based decorations or even a lifeguard tower bedframe, makes the ocean available anytime. City-based designs are also popular: a young traveler might want to make their home base a bit more like Paris or New York City.

Colors and Patterns

It’s likely that the child for whom you are designing has a favorite color – or maybe a few of them. Kids’ spaces are great places to experiment with fun colors, like blue and green to bring the outdoors inside or soft pastels that make it spring-time year-round. Interesting patterns also offer possibilities – classic stripes, bold polka dots, or chevrons make kids’ spaces pop.

Chic Children's Bedroom Design with Calm Horizon - Arclin TFL

How Arclin TFL Can Help

Arclin TFL is the perfect base for your chic, child-friendly design. While style is key, functionality is also essential in rooms for children – Arclin TFL is long-lasting, easy to clean, and affordable when compared to comparable products. But Arclin TFL isn’t just about practicality; it’s also a beautiful framework for your design dreams. An option like Stinson Umber is the perfect underpinning for a woodlands-themed room. Calm Horizon could help create the beach space mentioned above, while beige or black might be the ideal backdrop for some exciting patterns. No matter what design you choose, Arclin TFL provides a stylish, sound place to start.

Tiny Homes, Big Statements

“Go big or go home” doesn’t necessarily apply these days…even when we’re talking about homes. Tiny houses – and associated environmental, social, and financial lifestyles sometimes called tiny living – are big news. From television series to books and websites, tenets of tiny are everywhere. Whether you are just looking to downsize a bit to save some money or are ready to go truly tiny, Arclin TFL has you covered.

The What and Why of Tiny

For decades, people have measured success by more – more cars, more electronics, and more square footage in their residences. Bigger was seen as better, which had ramifications on people’s finances, their lifestyles, and on the larger environment. The average American home (which measures approximately 2,600 square feet) accounts for around one-third to one-half of the homeowner’s budget, or around 15 years of work, just to pay for their homes. Scaling back on home size allows tiny movement enthusiasts to spend less time concerned about home payments and more time enjoying their homes – or other experiences that less-expensive home ownership affords them.

At the same time, the tiny home trend offers some substantial environmental benefits. Smaller residences require less energy to heat and cool. Homes consisting of 100-400 square feet produce just 2,000 pounds of carbon emissions annually; an average-sized home produces 28,000 pounds. Using environmentally- friendly and/or recycled building materials is also common in tiny home production.

Tiny, Tasteful, Eco-friendly Value

A typical concern of those considering “going tiny” is lack of design or function. When we think of tiny, we may think of austere structures with little utility and less style. That does not have to be the case, however – you can enjoy the personal and environmental benefits of a scaled-down residence without sacrificing your home’s beauty.

Arclin’s residential TFL products offer a variety of finishes, whether you are leaning toward a woodsy, cabin aesthetic or the sleek, modern designs, often favored by urban tiny-dwellers. Arclin TFL designs such as the Global Harvest Collection provides a vast range of options certain to wed tiny and style seamlessly. Plus, Arclin’s TFL is ideal for those considering tiny living to reduce their environmental footprint – the wood-alternative, environmentally-friendly veneers mean you can design with your living space conscientiously (at any size). Visit Arclin’s design page to see more options and begin planning your tiny living adventure.

 

Investing in Luxury Apartments

When you think of real estate investment, you may think of buying a second home in a popular vacation spot to enjoy and rent at your leisure, or of people scoring large profits by “flipping” houses. However, you should also consider the potential of investing in apartments, and particularly, in luxury apartments. As more and more people are moving from single-family homes and adopting apartment living, this is a growing investment opportunity. Arclin TFL is an ideal component in your apartment investment strategy.

luxury-apartment-design-Arclin-TFL

Why Apartments?Why Luxury?

A well-documented trend in the housing market is that more people – from Baby Boomers to millennials – are forgoing home ownership and looking toward rental properties for their places of residence. Whether renters are looking to free themselves from home maintenance responsibilities or seeking the freedom to travel more often from a less-restrictive home base, apartment living is on the rise. At the same time, the cost of building new apartment complexes is growing more expensive, leaving the door open for savvy investors looking to buy existing buildings.

Modern apartment residents are not looking to sacrifice luxury in style and amenities. Contemporary renters expect the same quality materials and thoughtful design details that, in the past, were largely restricted to homes. Investors who can locate housing units in good locations at bargain prices and renovate with quality materials and amenities can expect excellent profits.

Functional Luxury

Bringing luxury to apartment settings is simple with Arclin’s residential TFL products. For example, copper elements and accents are very popular, providing warmth and comfort to design palettes. Arclin TFL’s Midtown Collection provides options that speak to this aesthetic. Plus, all TFL products provide consistency and durability to ensure product longevity – your TFL-decorated rental properties will look as good to your fifth renters as they did to your first. In fact, your tenants will also enjoy Arclin TFL’s easy to clean and maintain surfaces, allowing them to keep their apartments looking great with less effort. Please visit our design page for more ideas on your investment property options.

 

NeoCon Surface Trends 2018

NeoCon, one of the industry’s leading commercial design industry trade shows, always feeds our need for new trends in the colorful and ever-changing landscape of commercial interiors design. Here’s what caught our decorative surfaces-geek eye at the show last month:

Contrast in greys.

As we’ve seen in previous years, grey tones continue their prominence in the world of case goods. What’s new? Warmth and contrast — and lots of it! Office spaces featured dark panels with high accent colorations; and many of the greys (lineal and cathedral) now show a nuanced incorporation of warmth married with a lush taupe-ish tone.

Evolution in structure.

Everywhere we looked, tables and desktops featured more robust detailing and elegant cathedral structures. Lineal structures are still part of the design palette, but nowhere as prominent as we’ve seen in previous years. From accent walls to desktops, tables to flooring, sweeping cathedrals adorned every corner of the NeoCon showrooms this year.

Raw Woods.

We’ve seen this trend grow in more industrial-looking spaces, but the creativity of application within a more traditional office space was one of our favorite application trends this year. Plywood, OSB, fresh cut real woods — unstained with only a sealant. Raw plywood edgebanding on tables and desktops. OSB and plywood accent walls. The depth of structure and movement of the raw wood look brings a renewed sense of elegance to what was once thought of as incomplete design.

Mixed materials.

A growing trend that continues to evolve — showcased not only with the combination of stone and woodgrain, but expanded to the use of different woodgrains and colorations together in one piece. We’re seeing an expanded contrast and versatility to traditional woodgrain applications.

Rustic evolution.

Traditional rustics have evolved into a more elegant, natural execution. With added sophistication, the new rustics are more about realism than simply the appearance cracks and knots — it’s about rich natural luxury that creates a picturesque palette for a variety of interiors.

Bringing Home into Hotels

Since 2016, hotels have been a $199.3 billion industry in the U.S. alone. With all signs pointing to continued growth, hotels constantly must evolve and consider renovating their designs. One big emerging trend has been making hotels feel more homey as consumer preference trends away from the standardized looks. Big factors to these rapid changes are companies like Airbnb and HomeAway that provide a home away from home, luring hotel occupants to an alternative, more casual experience. As a result, many hotel chains are adopting the same sense of charm in their design. Here are a few ways hotels can bring a feeling of “home” to their guests.

Shared Spaces

Creating a living room-like shared space is one take on a sense of community that may be felt in a homestead. Hotels are beginning to deviate from traditional reception areas and take this approach in their designs. Hilton Embassy Suites’ newest hotel in Boulder, Colorado created an open living room and dining room concept in their lobby, and other hotels are leveraging similar design concepts. When it comes to using TFL designs in hotel “living room” areas, we like the dramatic feel of Charles Bridge — its cool tones and dramatic motion stand out from more traditional hotel styles.

Home Hotel - Charles Bridge - Arclin TFL

Activity Spaces

Guests who travel frequently are especially prone to enjoy activities that remind them of home. According to an article on Quartz Media citing Morgan Stanley Research, these guests are most likely to try Airbnb, reinforcing the notion that hotels should aim to cater to these preferences.

Designing spaces for activities is a great way to incorporate a home-like feel into hotels. A library stocked with popular literature and or an exercise room equipped with convenient storage cubbies, yoga mats and air diffusers can create a calming atmosphere. Arclin provides TFL designs that can help create this homey feel. Designs like Stinson Umber have the fidelity of real wood that provides a wonderful, natural accent in shelving units and desk spaces. 

Stinson Umber by Arclin TFL in Hospitality Design

Design+Convenience

Guests expect to have the same at-home conveniences in their hotel rooms. For example, many hotel rooms are now equipped with several USB ports and outlets, some are even included within the furniture itself to make the design look more elegant. You can achieve that elegant look with the dark, rich design of Noce Moscato — a stunning choice for accent walls, room built-ins and sitting areas. All can help create a warm, welcoming space.  

Offering updated storage solutions for long-term guests is another design feature growing in popularity. Traditional closets and drawers used to be standard, but now many hotels are opting for nooks, open closets for exposed clothing and storage underneath beds for bags.

Noce Moscato by Arclin TFL in Hotel Design

Before you jump into your next hospitality design projects, read our article on Alternative Building Materials That Create a Luxury Look Without a Luxe Price for some more great ideas.

Cubicle Comeback?

Open space design has enjoyed stylistic preference in the last decade, from homes and outdoor areas to workplaces. Open design office spaces are touted as places that foster creativity, communication, and access to teammates: all clear organizational advantages.

However, a loss of personal workspace, coupled with increased distractions – 53% of workers in a recent study noted coworkers sidetracked them as they tried to work; 42% stated they had improvised designs to try to block out such interruptions – are leading organizational designers to reconsider how they are staging offices.

Office Cubicles - Arclin

While the sea of tiny cubicles that has so often been the punchline of work-related jokes in the past may not be the solution, innovative, adaptive designs providing employees personalized, productive spaces are gaining attention. Mobile work technology and ever-increasing access to Wi-Fi allows employees greater freedom than ever in where they choose to work. Co-work spaces, home offices, and coffeehouses have helped to redefine what it means to “go to work.” Companies seeking to incentivize working from a shared organizational space are challenged to create designs that provide what have been called “employee experience centers”: modern, functional, stylish places where employees are excited to show up, settle in, and work.

Office Cubicles

One strategy in this trend is dedicating customized areas for specific tasks and daily workplace operations and experiences. For instance, an office may include some open space to host collaborative initiatives, private workspaces for those who need environments free from interruption, and kitchen areas that mimic the retail environments offsite employees have grown to enjoy. Arclin’s collection of decorative overlays for the office  provide the variety, functionality, and durability to create such spaces – offices where staff members benefit from home-like amenities as well as the tools they need to succeed in their jobs. Options such as Matterhorn and Folkstone are ideal backdrops for clean, modern spaces that foster creativity.

Individual and Global Benefits

Traditional workplace designs created a clear sense of hierarchy: those in charge inhabited large, richly decorated offices, while those working beneath them were relegated to small, impersonal spaces. New thinking in office design emphasizes the importance of each team member, providing design options that take individual preference and taste in mind. Arclin’s varied design palates such as Midtown Harvest Collection and The Legacy Collection allow this sort of decorative diversity, ensuring employees benefit from personalized workspaces that lend themselves to innovation.

While highlighting the importance of individuals is key, organizations are also moving toward green designs and materials that honor the environment beyond the office. TFL, with its sustainably sourced materials, can help companies achieve both goals, offering beautiful design options that express individual design preferences while protecting natural resources for all.

Office Cubicle Design - Arclin

What Baby Boomers Look for in a Rental Apartment

While apartment life has historically been viewed as an option chosen by younger people, new trends in real estate reveal that older adults are now the fastest-growing segment of renters. A need for affordable housing options, particularly in the wake of the recent economic recession, is a strong motivating factor. But, Baby Boomers (born between 1946 and 1964) aren’t merely seeking a less-expensive alternative to traditional single family homes: they want spaces with services, amenities, and style. With more than 5,000,000 Baby Boomers predicted to rent their next living space by 2020, Arclin is poised to provide the safe, convenient, attractive product designs required by those designing and building the next generation of rental properties.

Chic Convenience

Rental homes offer Baby Boomers convenience: less yardwork, house cleaning, and maintenance obligations gives renters more freedom, and may be particularly appealing to who are looking to downsize both their belongings and their time commitments.

Arclin Modern Apartment Design

While the advantages of access to resources for repairs and upkeep of their properties is a significant benefit, these renters are also looking for spaces created with materials that allow for easy day-to-day living. Arclin’s decorative overlays for TFL are ideal: germ-resistant, low maintenance surfaces that promote clean environments. At the same time, TFL provides the rich style options Baby Boomers desire in their homes: warm, light palates such as Candlelight Apple or Hard Rock Maple demonstrate that healthy surfaces don’t need to look sterile.

Ready-Made Community

Another great advantage to apartment living for Baby Boomers is the opportunity to expand their social circles – many rental spaces include recreation areas and options that encourage tenants to forge friendships. This can be particularly desirable to “empty nesters” who may not live in the same area as their children and grandchildren.

Harvest Bathroom (Skyline Dark & Skyline Dusk)

Taking advantage of social opportunities can make settings conducive to hosting and entertaining a strong priority for Baby Boomers when they are considering apartment options – something architects and interior designers should keep in mind. Cabinets, furniture, and shelving in a broad range of color and design choices – from Skyline Dusk to Galaxy White and others – can create attractive, inviting, easy-to-clean spaces for renters and their guests. Arclin designs are ideal for the spaces this growing population want, and the design and architecture professionals working to accommodate them.

5 Building Materials for Eco-Friendly Interiors

5 Eco-Friendly Building Materials - Arclin TFL

Over the last decade, architecture and interior design have embraced more natural alternatives. And it is no surprise, when you consider that sustainability is an attractive move for both the planet and profit.

Architect Magazine reported in October that buildings consume about 40% of the energy in the U.S. annually. In addition, they are responsible for emitting nearly half of the carbon dioxide in our atmosphere. The 2017 article, “The Climate Is Changing. So Must Architecture,” calls for architects to use more sustainable materials that consume far fewer resources.

Consumers want healthier materials in their spaces that are kinder to our natural resources. Architects and interior designers need to seek out solutions such as designing LEED certified buildings, which can drop carbon dioxide emissions by more than 30% while reducing water and energy consumption.

While companies like Arclin are always developing innovative eco-friendly materials, here are five options to consider today when designing an eco-friendly interior.

Coco Tiles

Coco tiles are a natural alternative for flooring, backsplashes, walls, etc. Made from reclaimed coconut shells, this product reduces waste, while bringing a hint of nature into offices, restaurants, health care facilities and hotels. Kirei, a company focused on creating eco-friendly products, has mastered the art of the coco tile.

Bamboo

Bamboo has traditionally been used for decorating, but is now making a name for itself as an alternative building material. Using bamboo as flooring can be beneficial in more ways than one. Bamboo is water-resistant, and won’t stain like traditional hardwood flooring that swells when water is trapped inside a panel. And, bamboo flooring can be extremely durable depending on how it is manufactured, especially if it is strand woven. You can expect easy maintenance if you choose bamboo flooring.

Reclaimed Wood

Reclaimed wood can be used for flooring, furniture, ceiling beams, and so much more. Using reclaimed wood in interior design is an eco-friendly way to add character to any room. The color palettes affiliated with reclaimed wood are limitless. It can add a tropical atmosphere to a restaurant or a feeling of comfort to a healthcare facility. Reclaimed wood is an eco-friendly alternative to cutting down living trees for building materials. You can rest easy knowing that your interior design isn’t harming the environment.

Cork

Cork is a versatile material that can be used all over your home or in commercial spaces. Adding a sheet of cork to an office wall can offer sustainability, because the extraction process for cork does not harm the tree it is taken from and the bark it is made from replenishes every 9 years. It also adds convenience and utility to the room. Additionally, cork provides excellent insulation for both temperature and acoustics control. This cost-effective material has also been used for flooring, as its cushion-like surface is easy to stand on for long periods of time.

TFL

Our favorite green product of all is TFL — a cost-effective alternative to the other surface options on the market. When considering the use TFL in your next design project, remember that these products are versatile and work across a variety of applications and industries. With advanced printing technologies, these decorative overlays enable us to mimic the design properties of real wood, but it is made with papers derived from tree fibers grown on controlled, fast-growing plantations. Just take a look at designs like Charles Bridge to see what we mean!

 

New Design Trends for Senior Living Centers

Many senior living communities are working toward new and improved facility designs with a heavy focus on creating functional and comfortable spaces for residents. From expanded amenities to advanced technology, here are a few design changes that will be seen in senior living centers throughout the new year.

Design of Senior Living CenterMore Integrated Technology

Technology is advancing in all industries, and senior living centers are not exempt. Installing Wi-Fi is a common initiative to improve communication for residents. They enjoy being able to send email or Facebook messages to their friends, kids, and grandchildren. This creates a need for designing communal spaces for seniors to access the internet, like community cyber cafes or home office spaces. 

LED lighting is another technology that will continue to expand in senior living centers. The energy and long-term cost saving benefits are highly valued by these facilities. Designers should take note of this change as LED lights give off direct light, unlike its incandescent or halogen counterparts, which give off multi-directional light. Lighting can affect the entire look of an area and should be kept in-mind when designing individual rooms or community spaces.

Community Enhancing Amenities

Senior living centers have embraced a sense of community and are taking steps to expand interactions.They are opening salons, gyms, and restaurants that are open to the public in order to encourage integration between their residents and the general public. With these types of new features, special care should be taken to protect seniors’ immune systems. Having surfaces that are germ-resistant and easy to maintain, like TFL, can contribute greatly to the space and benefit its residents. As an environmentally friendly alternative to solid woods and veneers, TFL emits low to no volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which improves indoor air quality and means seniors will not have to bear the strong odors often associated with new construction. 

Senior living communities are also striving for design efficiency by building multipurpose spaces. A community clubhouse can sport an entertainment room that doubles as a cafe, and a community outdoor field may be designed for activities such as croquet and bocce ball.

Senior Living Center Design Samples

An Elegant Feel

With the number of residents in senior living centers on the rise, there is a growing demand for, simply put, better-looking facilities. That’s why luxury designs are exploding in these communities. There is a trending concept that equates senior living centers to resort-style living communities. Designs like Ankor Stone, Charles Bridge. and Kinabalu Teak can pair well with rich fabrics and upholstery, luxe decor, and glam fixtures to create attractive spaces in a senior living facility. If this type of project is on your schedule this year, take a look at the decorative overlays from Arclin TFL, including our Harvest Collection, to create modern spaces that will make seniors feel like they are retiring in style.

Senior living center design arclin tfl

 

Minimalism vs. Maximalism: What You Need to Know

In 2017, minimalism was a hot topic. And now, two months into 2018, the word “maximalism” is becoming more present in the interior design world. In an ever-changing industry, we understand that it can be difficult to keep up! So we’re here to fill you in on the two trends and you can decide which is the best fit for your design projects.

Minimalism: Less is More

In a nutshell, less is more for minimalism. Minimalism is about simplicity. In interior and commercial design, this can be applied to a building’s structure, material overlay, decor, and furniture. The clean lines, neutral and soft color palettes, and the opening of spaces often associated with minimalism reflect some of the movement’s core values. The tone of minimalism intends to evoke actions of peace. Think of slowing down, breathing deeply, and practicing gratitude. Spas and hospitals can benefit from the tranquility that minimalism can inspire. Minimalism can also function well in small, or boutique-style retail stores because it promotes organization and space optimization. A minimalist interior design can offer a great pairing for offices or stores that concentrate their branding efforts on innovation or modernism. Apple stores use minimalism to present a sleek and modern style, which echoes many of their product designs.

Minimalism Cafe Design - Arclin TFL

Maximalism: Go Big or Go Home

As you may have guessed, maximalism tugs at the opposite end of the spectrum from that of minimalism. Maximalism combines different textures, colors, and patterns to explore the potential of a room or building. It supports variety and excessiveness, and gives designers permission to find balance from diversity to make everything blend together in perfect harmony for one eclectic design. This trend can benefit a retail store by leaving room to showcase a unique and attractive brand through decorative choices. Maximalism can also work well for cutting-edge fashion retailers that want to reflect creativity in the design of their stores. Maximalism may also be the perfect fit for cafes or restaurants that want to uphold a quirky and unique spirit in their presentation.

Maximalism - Arclin TFL

The Winner?

Is there a correct choice when it comes to which side of the fence you’re on in the minimalism vs. maximalism debate? The truth is that there are benefits to adopting either trend. It all comes down to the identity of the business and which trend mimics its personality and brand best. If you find yourself somewhere in the middle, great! Commercial and interior design are about artistry, functionality, and making the right mark on a space. Whatever your vision, know that Arclin is on your side. Our decorative overlays for TFL can complement a simplistic and open office space or a piquant hotel or retail store. Explore our TFL collections to discover which laminate best fits your vision here.

Ten Technical Decorative Surfaces Terms You Need to Know

Every industry has its “lingo” and it is no different when it comes to decorative overlays. If you’ve scrolled through the Arclin website and come across terms that have left you a little puzzled, don’t worry. Here are our top ten TFL terms we think you should know!

  1. TFL – Thermally Fused Laminates. TFL is a durable, high-performing and consistent surface product that is less expensive than veneers and HPL (see below). TFL is made by fusing resin soaked decorative paper directly to a substrate. It is ideal for a wide variety of products and environments. TFL also complements HPL, and the same or compatible designs are typically available in both laminates. While veneers have been around since ancient Egyptian times, they certainly have come a long way.
  2. HPL – High Pressure Laminates. Similar to TFL, HPL also provide a durable surface overlay. However, HPL is traditionally used for extreme-traffic surfaces and are produced by saturating multiple layers of craft paper with phenolic resin. A layer of printed décor paper is placed on top of the multiple layers of kraft paper before pressing and fusing the paper with a substrate. 
  3. Overlay – a covering for a material’s surface. TFL and HPL are examples of decorative overlays.
  4. Substrate – refers to an underlying material on which paper or other materials are applied. In the decorative overlays industry, we may classify particleboard or plywood as substrates.
  5. Thermoset –  a material, commonly a resin or synthetic plastic, that hardens after the application of heat and pressure.
  6. Fidelity – the level of accuracy with which something is replicated. In the decorative overlays industry, this term may be used to describe how well TFL or other overlays mimic the look or texture of specific materials, like wood or marble.
  7. Veneer – a thin decorative layer of material applied to a substrate. Veneers can offer the look of highly sought after materials at a lower cost. Check out our post Alternative Building Materials That Create a Luxury Look Without a Luxe Price for a deeper look at this.
  8. Grain – the longitudinal arrangement or pattern of fibers in wood, paper, etc. TFL, especially textured TFL, can mimic the look of real wood grains.
  9. Sustainable – conserving an ecological balance by avoiding depletion of natural resources. In construction, this means that steps have been taken to reduce the carbon footprint of the building or furniture while using materials that do not deplete natural resources.
  10. Low-Emission – Materials such as paint and adhesives contain volatile organic compounds, or VOCs. VOC’s unique properties allow the material to evaporate so paints dry and leave pigment behind, or adhesives dry and bond materials together. However, it is not recommended to be exposed to VOCs too often. Low-emission material, such as TFL, are designed to emit low or no VOCs — making for a very environmentally healthy application (also Shades of Green). Low-emission building material can help achieve LEED certification and are, in general, just healthier for the people around it!

Are there other technical terms in the world of TFL? Post a comment with your questions on our Facebook page.

 

Best of Ikea Furniture

When IKEA’s founder, Ingvar Kamprad, asked his father for money to launch his entrepreneurial pursuit in 1943, it’s hard to imagine he had any idea how successful his venture would become! IKEA started off by selling mostly small household items like pens, wallets and picture frames, and eventually added furniture five years after it’s opening. In 1956, IKEA’s famous and innovative flat pack and self assembly options were introduced with the LÖVET, now called the LÖVBACKEN, end table. By staying focused on design, innovation and the environment, this has propelled IKEA to become one of the largest furniture retailers in the world.

IKEA keeps the planet and their customers in mind. Although almost ⅔ of their home furnishings are made from wood, they’ve invested in ways to improve forestry management practices. Staying true to their cultural values to make more with less and minimize waste, IKEA ensures that the trees used for their products are utilized in their entirety. IKEA products represent simplicity and minimalism at its best, offering quality products made from sustainable resources at affordable prices.

We researched the best of the best that IKEA has to offer:

BILLY Bookcase

Launched in 1978, the BILLY Bookcase clearly doesn’t go out of style. Known for its customizability, it can be as small or big as your heart desires by adding on additional components. It comes in IKEA’s four signature colors (white, birch veneer, black-brown and brown ash veneer) so it is as versatile as it is customizable. In fact, the BILLY Bookcase is such a perfect blank canvas to design your own space that it has spurred an active following of BILLY Hacks, creative ideas of how to up-cycle or put a personal touch on how these bookcases are used.  On top of that, its eco-friendly, smart design uses the least amount of wood possible.  

Fun fact: it is estimated that every 5 seconds a BILLY is sold somewhere in the world!

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LÖVBACKEN

A little table with a big story: Originally the LÖVET, this piece made a successful comeback as the LÖVBACKEN side table. With a 5-star rating, this Mid-century Modern inspired classic is now one of the most popular items sold at IKEA. We love it because it’s compact, and small enough to flat pack, yet probably the most useful stylish thing you can have in your home or office.

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The POÄNG Armchair

The POÄNG Armchair is another piece that has earned its “classic” title for the past four decades. This product is definitely a crowd pleaser, selling a whopping 1.5 million units each year. It is available in full-size, kid-size, rocking and ottoman form. We love that you can put your own style on it by choosing from a variety of cushion styles and washable covers. Plus, it is made with renewable sources of cotton and wood, giving you the option to recycle.  arclintfl_ikea_poang-armchair-beige

The MALM Series

The MALM series is a minimalist’s dream. It includes bed frames (with and without storage), several drawer chest options, office desks, accessories, and even a book! We love it because you can combine all the Malm products for the full experience, or keep them separate and still look chic. These products are also comprised of 80% renewable wood.

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STOCKHOLM Rug

The STOCKHOLM rug is a fan favorite, and for good reason. It is available in various designs and colors. It is also durable and soil resistant so it can literally be placed anywhere. We love this product for several reasons: not only does it look amazing, adding a nice pop of color and design to your space, but it comes with a special story. Every single STOCKHOLM rug is handwoven with 100% pure new wool in India by the most skilled craftspeople. arclintfl_ikea_stockholm-rug-flatwoven-brownKLIPPAN Sofa

An IKEA classic introduced back in the 1980’s, the KLIPPAN Sofa is kid and wallet friendly. We love this sofa because it’s dependable and functional, plus it is cozy enough for two. A machine washable seat cover can be purchased for the two-seat sofa. Cover colors are available in black, white or yellow. The KLIPPAN is the perfect base to accessorize with pillows and throw blankets. Add a side table on either end of this piece to create an inviting space.

 

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The Rise of the Food Hall

Food halls — the more sophisticated cousin to food courts — are on the rise in cities all across the United States. Evolved from the traditional market places where proprietors would gather to sell their specialities, the modern food hall borrows that notion of authenticity; but, instead of setting up shop in a mall or airport, vendors typically repurpose old factories or warehouses and often feature locally produced or sourced food. On the occasion the food halls are built from scratch, they are often located in budding city centers where foot traffic is a sure bet.

And with more than 100 modern food halls dotting major cities, it’s becoming easier to choose where to eat local — and in style.  And according to commercial real estate firm Cushman & Wakefield, more options are on the way. The number of food halls are expected to double by 2019. 

Why so popular?

Food halls give people the ability to walk through an architecturally interesting building and have choose from a number of cuisine options. Some food halls are refurbished warehouses or train stations, while others are new construction. Regardless, you find open and airy spaces that use interesting materials to create intimate spaces in a sea of bustle.

Food halls take a more local twist on traditional food courts, allowing local vendors to set up shop in an area supported by other local businesses with strong foot traffic.

Union Market, DC

One of the oldest markets in the United States, Union Market (then called Centre Market) was born as fresh food venue born over 200 years ago. After being forced to relocate to make room for the National Archives, it reopened as the Union Terminal Market in 1931. The market featured large, airy, well lit indoor stalls for 700 vendors, cold storage vaults, elevators and a public café. Through the years, another move, and a rough period in the 1980s when vendors abandoned the city for the suburbs, Union Market today is a bustling center of commerce and cuisine.

Keeping true to its original open and airy design, today the renovated industrial space features more than 40 food vendors, shops and work spaces. Former loading docks serve as dining patios, creative lighting forms attractive spaces, and flexible wall coverings make the concrete structure usable.  

Union Market Rise Food Hall - Arclin TFL (Photos from @unionmarketdc)

Legacy Hall, Plano

Deep in the heart of Texas, the newly opened Legacy Hall in Plano is a combination of food hall, craft brewery, beer garden and entertainment platform rolled into one. The three-story development includes seven bars and over 20 vendor stalls, including one that rotates regularly according to an Eater article. Whether you’re in the mood for chicken, donuts, fruit or seafood, the Legacy Hall has it covered.

Built out of a combination of shipping containers, repurposed pallets, glass and steel, this brand new hall benefits from an indoor-outdoor flow.

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(Photos from @legacyfoodhall)

The Bottling Department, San Antonio

This old brewery bottling department turned food hall sits near the San Antonio River. Its renovated design still echos its original 1800s industrial factory look with exposed brick and salvaged cornerstones. The new mix of contemporary features like natural wood-like element, straight lines, and pops of color make for a time transportive experience.

Though a smaller food hall featuring just five chef-led vendors, the Pearl’s Bottling Department’s new purpose is to bring forth a culinary collaboration between, farmers, ranchers, chefs, and food lovers.

Bottling Department Food Hall - Arclin TFL

(Photos from @bottlinedept)

The rise of the food hall is changing the way people dine out and with the abundant choices, is a guaranteed crowd pleaser. We’re excited to see the creative design (and delectable concoctions) food halls are rolling out in more cities across the U.S – keep a look out for one near you!

Five Design Trends You’ll See in 2018

The new year is almost here, and that means new design trends in interiors are on the horizon. 2017 was a year filled with shades of green and marble overlays, but 2018 has more in store. With new colors, patterns and designs, it will be a forward-focused year.

1. Modern Color Palettes

Color palettes that snuck into the last stretch of 2017 will pop up frequently in the new year. You can expect to see woodsy and warm neutrals that create an inviting atmosphere in 2018. Neutrals will be complemented with gold and green accents. Oranges, reds and yellows will make their mark as well.

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2. It’s All About Patterns

A natural evolution from texture is patterns. This year was all about textures, but 2018 will offer a new way to liven up neutrals when patterns provide a balance of pop without being too busy. Accent colors paired with a hint of patterns boast the perfect combination of cozy and modern ambience.

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3. Bringing it Back to Nature

Tying nature into design is going to continue to be a trend leader. Studies have shown that bringing nature indoors provokes feelings of happiness and peace. Forest green accents, living plants and woodsy overlays will continue to be very popular in 2018. Check out our blog Natural Connection: The Return of Bringing Nature Indoors to read more about this trend.

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4. Redesigning the Workplace

In the past years, office spaces have leaned toward an open concept. Although some open spaces are still appreciated in the workplace, you will be seeing more closed-in collaborative spaces in 2018. We’ve all finally realized how difficult it can be to have a phone call when a others are in the room around you! However, the spaces will be a far cry from a return to cubicles.  We’ll see a happy medium next year between open spaces for brainstorming sessions and places to retreat to when autonomous work needs to get done.

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5. Less is More in Commercial Design

The word minimalism has been widespread over the last year. Minimalism ran through residential spaces, and is making a strong mark on commercial design. We expect minimalistic style will be seen in salons, hotels, and retail stores — just about everywhere in 2018. Take a look at our blog on Mighty Minimalism to read about this trend in retail design.

Interior of Modern Room Furnished with Contemporary Office and Sitting Furniture, Featuring Two Bright Yellow Chairs Around Small Round Table and Office Desk and Computer in Background. 3d Rendering

We’re excited to see what other trends 2018 will bring to the table. Our blog will be filled with trending topics throughout the new year, so be sure to keep up with our posts. If you’re ready to get onboard with any of the trends listed above, get in touch with us at https://arclintfl.com/contact/ to see which TFL designs match your vision.

Retail Design with Millennials in Mind

Retail design is constantly changing, and keeping up with trends that appeal to modern consumers can be a challenge. Millennials have put their stamp on the world and their interests don’t always match that of their Baby Boomer predecessors. Millennial shopping preferences are affecting business and those in retail should pay attention. What are Millennials searching for when they walk into their favorite retail store? Here’s what we’ve found:

Organization is a Must

If there is one thing to note, it’s that Millennials are not big on clutter. Taking a more minimalistic approach to retail design is the way to go when appealing to Millennial consumers. Keeping the design crisp and neat will draw in these type of shoppers. Whether it’s strategic shelving or compartments, less is always more. Millennials like a more open concepts as well. Be sure to check out our blog post Mighty Minimalism for more insight on the trend.

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Keep it Classy

Cultivating a high-end vibe will attract Millennial shoppers. This generation goes for quality over quantity and isn’t afraid to spend their money on the products they really desire. Even if the merchandise isn’t considered high-end, laying out the store to create that impression will certainly catch their attention. Modernizing the store with a clean and upscale layout will appeal to Millennial shoppers and keep them coming back. This generation of consumers care about how a business brands itself, so keep this in mind if your target audience includes Millennials.

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Make it Easy

Making the customer work harder than they have to is never a good sales strategy, especially when it comes to the Millennial generation. Growing up with technology, Millennials have had unlimited information at their fingertips most of their lives. This means that their level of patience is much lower than Baby Boomers which can pose a real problem in retail. Keep conventionality in mind when designing the layout of the store. Easy navigation is key for your Millennial audience and consumers in general.

Millennials are taking over the retail shopping world and they aren’t afraid to speak up when it comes to what they want out of a business or product. This generation is big on web reviews, so keep these tips in mind to make sure your retail store is up to par.