Tagged commercial design

TFL Before and After: Hospitality Spaces

TFL in Hospitality

TFL, Hotel Room, Hospitality

The hospitality industry has, in the last decade, demonstrated continuing recovery from the Recession of the late 2000s. From 2009-2017, U.S. hotel bookings grew from $116 billion to $185 billion, while other sectors, such as restaurants, showed associated growth. At the same time, U.S. venues face increasing competition from international counterparts, making the drive to improve on infrastructure and amenities more and more essential.

From better lobby experiences to sleeker interiors, hospitality locations are evolving so they may bring more guests in, and keep them in their venues longer. Learn how Arclin’s decorative overlays for TFL can help make your hotel or food service location a friendlier, more profitable space.  

Design an Experience, Not Just a Space

common area tfl, Hospitality

Players in the hospitality industry face unique challenges – among them, the diverse range of stakeholders served and the growing expectations of these guests. While the physical elements of the places these consumers occupy are critical, “It’s also about designing an experience that flows,” says WATG|Wimberly Interiors, a hospitality design firm. Hoteliers are moving away from traditional, generic designs and toward an optimized visitor experience. For instance, a “blurring” between home experiences and hotel experiences, with more relaxed, yet stylish designs, are gaining popularity. Extended-stay hotels are increasingly mimicking home-like amenities, with emphasis on separate guest and visitor spaces and upgraded kitchen and bathroom facilities.

TFL, with its ability to serve as the foundation for any room, can set the stage for high-quality hotel stays. Equally at home in kitchen, bathroom, and living settings, TFL is the durable, functional option around which to build rooms and suites. In addition to being long-lasting, easy to clean, and maintain, TFL’s vast array of style options allows you to take your guest experience anywhere it needs to go.

Convenience Without Compromise: Restaurant Design Trends

TFL, Restaurant, social setting, design

Guests are seeking more from the locations they patronize – restaurants, cafes, and other food service locations are increasingly serving as spots for food, socialization, and work. Spaces are shifting to accommodate distance workers and telecommuters – those who are conducting business from home or alternative locations. This also includes those undertaking multiple roles (such as student and employee) from a single venue.

On one hand, this has placed a premium on an open concept, adaptable layouts that can accommodate these varied needs. At the same time, incorporating touches of elegance into design and offerings is also appreciated and rewarded by guests. For example, fine dining establishments are exploring ways to provide quality food experiences at lower price points, with associated shifts in design. Cafes and other venues associated with higher-dollar parent establishments are enjoying strong growth.

TFL, with its capacity to adapt to any sort of hospitality space you can envision, has you covered for walls, fixtures, and more. At once practical and elegant, it’s perfectly suited to restaurants-as-workspaces, those trying to achieve casual glamour, and anything in between. Contact Arclin to discuss possible design options, or with any questions you might have.

The Role of Community in Design

In an increasingly connected world, community is an expansive concept. It is made broader by the variety of ways in which we now communicate. We are members of multiple communities at any given moment: both in-person and virtually. The importance of community, and a desire to grow and nurture communities is having an impact on design. We increasingly seek places in which we can bring together the people important to us: family, friends, co-workers, and others. To this end, spaces such as community housing, multigenerational homes, and workspaces that facilitate collaboration are growing in popularity.

Arclin TFL allows the flexibility and functionality that gives these community spaces life. With its affordable, attractive, and low-maintenance choices – in an array of design options – TFL can be the cornerstone of places where groups come together for work, play, and home life.

Arclin TFL - Community Designs

Sustainable Function for All Community Members

Creating community living and working spaces is a challenging venture. But it is one well worth the time and resources invested. Of primary concern is whether the spaces truly accommodate all community members. The emphasis must be on creating a “place,” and not simply rendering a design. These spaces need to allow residents and workers – all with unique needs and abilities – to pursue their goals and live their lives in a safe, comfortable, and inviting environment. Workspaces must facilitate collaboration between a variety of team members, while homes must accommodate family members of all ages and capabilities.

At the same time, community-focused design and place-making must be mindful of consumers’ continuing commitment to sustainable design and materials. Green architecture principles and advances in environmentally friendly materials mean that community members need not choose between being environmentally conscious and having attractive living and working spaces.

The Role of Community in Design and TFL

Arclin TFL - Community Design - Iconic Walnut Design

Arclin TFL is an ideal choice for community-centric design projects, with beautiful, functional materials that can anchor spaces that suit all family, work, and social group members. TFL is easy to clean; has the natural, organic look that is so popular with consumers now; offers an environmentally friendly alternative to other surfaces; and has a variety of available design options. For instance, Arclin’s new-for-2019 Harvest Collection offers elements of trendy Scandinavian design, wood grains, and both warm and cool color palettes. Arclin also has options from residential to retail, supporting all of the communities important to you and your clients. Contact us today to learn more.

Cubicle Comeback?

Open space design has enjoyed stylistic preference in the last decade, from homes and outdoor areas to workplaces. Open design office spaces are touted as places that foster creativity, communication, and access to teammates: all clear organizational advantages.

However, a loss of personal workspace, coupled with increased distractions – 53% of workers in a recent study noted coworkers sidetracked them as they tried to work; 42% stated they had improvised designs to try to block out such interruptions – are leading organizational designers to reconsider how they are staging offices.

Office Cubicles - Arclin

While the sea of tiny cubicles that has so often been the punchline of work-related jokes in the past may not be the solution, innovative, adaptive designs providing employees personalized, productive spaces are gaining attention. Mobile work technology and ever-increasing access to Wi-Fi allows employees greater freedom than ever in where they choose to work. Co-work spaces, home offices, and coffeehouses have helped to redefine what it means to “go to work.” Companies seeking to incentivize working from a shared organizational space are challenged to create designs that provide what have been called “employee experience centers”: modern, functional, stylish places where employees are excited to show up, settle in, and work.

Office Cubicles

One strategy in this trend is dedicating customized areas for specific tasks and daily workplace operations and experiences. For instance, an office may include some open space to host collaborative initiatives, private workspaces for those who need environments free from interruption, and kitchen areas that mimic the retail environments offsite employees have grown to enjoy. Arclin’s collection of decorative overlays for the office  provide the variety, functionality, and durability to create such spaces – offices where staff members benefit from home-like amenities as well as the tools they need to succeed in their jobs. Options such as Matterhorn and Folkstone are ideal backdrops for clean, modern spaces that foster creativity.

Individual and Global Benefits

Traditional workplace designs created a clear sense of hierarchy: those in charge inhabited large, richly decorated offices, while those working beneath them were relegated to small, impersonal spaces. New thinking in office design emphasizes the importance of each team member, providing design options that take individual preference and taste in mind. Arclin’s varied design palates such as Midtown Harvest Collection and The Legacy Collection allow this sort of decorative diversity, ensuring employees benefit from personalized workspaces that lend themselves to innovation.

While highlighting the importance of individuals is key, organizations are also moving toward green designs and materials that honor the environment beyond the office. TFL, with its sustainably sourced materials, can help companies achieve both goals, offering beautiful design options that express individual design preferences while protecting natural resources for all.

Office Cubicle Design - Arclin

The Rise of the Food Hall

Food halls — the more sophisticated cousin to food courts — are on the rise in cities all across the United States. Evolved from the traditional market places where proprietors would gather to sell their specialities, the modern food hall borrows that notion of authenticity; but, instead of setting up shop in a mall or airport, vendors typically repurpose old factories or warehouses and often feature locally produced or sourced food. On the occasion the food halls are built from scratch, they are often located in budding city centers where foot traffic is a sure bet.

And with more than 100 modern food halls dotting major cities, it’s becoming easier to choose where to eat local — and in style.  And according to commercial real estate firm Cushman & Wakefield, more options are on the way. The number of food halls are expected to double by 2019. 

Why so popular?

Food halls give people the ability to walk through an architecturally interesting building and have choose from a number of cuisine options. Some food halls are refurbished warehouses or train stations, while others are new construction. Regardless, you find open and airy spaces that use interesting materials to create intimate spaces in a sea of bustle.

Food halls take a more local twist on traditional food courts, allowing local vendors to set up shop in an area supported by other local businesses with strong foot traffic.

Union Market, DC

One of the oldest markets in the United States, Union Market (then called Centre Market) was born as fresh food venue born over 200 years ago. After being forced to relocate to make room for the National Archives, it reopened as the Union Terminal Market in 1931. The market featured large, airy, well lit indoor stalls for 700 vendors, cold storage vaults, elevators and a public café. Through the years, another move, and a rough period in the 1980s when vendors abandoned the city for the suburbs, Union Market today is a bustling center of commerce and cuisine.

Keeping true to its original open and airy design, today the renovated industrial space features more than 40 food vendors, shops and work spaces. Former loading docks serve as dining patios, creative lighting forms attractive spaces, and flexible wall coverings make the concrete structure usable.  

Union Market Rise Food Hall - Arclin TFL (Photos from @unionmarketdc)

Legacy Hall, Plano

Deep in the heart of Texas, the newly opened Legacy Hall in Plano is a combination of food hall, craft brewery, beer garden and entertainment platform rolled into one. The three-story development includes seven bars and over 20 vendor stalls, including one that rotates regularly according to an Eater article. Whether you’re in the mood for chicken, donuts, fruit or seafood, the Legacy Hall has it covered.

Built out of a combination of shipping containers, repurposed pallets, glass and steel, this brand new hall benefits from an indoor-outdoor flow.

Legacy Hall Food Hall - Arclin TFL

(Photos from @legacyfoodhall)

The Bottling Department, San Antonio

This old brewery bottling department turned food hall sits near the San Antonio River. Its renovated design still echos its original 1800s industrial factory look with exposed brick and salvaged cornerstones. The new mix of contemporary features like natural wood-like element, straight lines, and pops of color make for a time transportive experience.

Though a smaller food hall featuring just five chef-led vendors, the Pearl’s Bottling Department’s new purpose is to bring forth a culinary collaboration between, farmers, ranchers, chefs, and food lovers.

Bottling Department Food Hall - Arclin TFL

(Photos from @bottlinedept)

The rise of the food hall is changing the way people dine out and with the abundant choices, is a guaranteed crowd pleaser. We’re excited to see the creative design (and delectable concoctions) food halls are rolling out in more cities across the U.S – keep a look out for one near you!