Tagged SurfaceSync

The Difference Between 2D and 3D Laminates

Both 2D and 3D laminates are plastic film products that can be used in overlays for decorative surfaces. There are a few differences to consider when choosing laminates for your next design project. Learn the essentials below between 2D and 3D laminates.

The Difference Between 2D and 3D Laminates

2D Laminates

First, 2D laminates are typically made from vinyl, polypropylene, or oriented polypropylene.

2D laminates are available in thicknesses from .0001” to .007″.

They can be used for surfaces on retail fixtures, cabinets, and residential and commercial flooring. Additionally, these films are processed by flat lamination and profile wrapping. They can be solid-colored or reverse printed. Additionally, they are treated and are resistant to:

  • Water
  • Chemicals
  • Scratches
  • Stains

The Difference Between 2D and 3D Laminates

3D Laminates

Like 2D laminates, 3D laminates have a broad range of uses, from commercial interiors to retail and healthcare fixtures. On the other hand, 3D laminates are made of polyvinyl chloride and polyester films and are thicker than 2D films.

Generally, they measure between .0008” to .040”.

These surfaces and edges are membrane pressed or vacuum formed in a thermoforming process. Further, they are a popular choice in a variety of design environments due to resistance in chipping, breaking, and cracking, and application seals. They’re even chemical resistant which makes them ideal for surfaces found on countertops, tabletops, and workspaces.

Consider 3D laminates for industries such as:

  • Healthcare
  • Offices
  • Hospitality
  • Residential Kitchens
  • Retail

The Difference Between 2D and 3D Laminates

Advantage of 3D Laminates

Design advantages of 3D laminates include flexibility in edge design (e.g., both contoured and soft). Furthermore, their seamless edging does not require edge treatments. Full substrate encapsulation supports ease of maintenance. Also, they’re suitable for impact resistance with a variety of gauge, gloss, texture, and prints.

Choices…

The Composite Panel Association talks more about the difference between 2d and 3d laminate films in this article. Whether you choose 2D or 3D laminates, you are considering products that provide long-lasting reliability and flexibility in design. Contact us today to find out more.

Design Rules for Matching Wood Surfaces

A time-honored classic in a range of design environments, the popularity of wood surfaces continues. With the versatility to fit into any decorating scheme, from traditional and rustic to minimal and modern, wood is an ideal choice. But how do you go about mixing different wood elements in your design schemes? Learn more about the design rules for matching wood surfaces and view a few of Arclin TFL’s wood finish options.

Warm Up; Be Cool When Matching Wood Surfaces

Creating a beautiful wood-based design does not require that all wood surfaces match; in fact, the visual interest that comes with mixing different kinds of wood in a space it part of the appeal. However, you can find some guidance by considering each wood’s undertone: is it warm or cool? Warm woods appear red, orange, or yellow (like Arclin’s Alabama Cherry), while cool woods look gray (check out Charles Bridge). Keeping all wood pieces in a space in the same undertone family can create a unified look. If in doubt, you can focus primarily on a beige-toned wood (such as Kinabalu Teak), which has a neutral undertone and will complement either warm or cool counterparts.

Design Rules for Matching Wood Surfaces

“Common” Sense in Matching Wood Surfaces

Ensuring that your wood elements have something in common will also tie your design together. Again: this doesn’t mean everything needs to match – just that the pieces share a theme. For instance, you might focus on wood pieces with strong, clean lines in a modern design scheme; or, you might consider working in pieces with a similar finish (e.g., woodgrain patterns like those in pine and oak). Applying this tactic along with the color considerations noted above will set you up for a space that is visually congruent, without being boring.

Design Rules for Matching Wood Surfaces

In with the New…and the Old

Most spaces evolve over time – particularly in residential settings. This means that pieces are added as needed and materials are not purchased and placed together. This creates a wonderful sense of history, as older pieces are mixed with newer in ways that reflect the occupants’ changing circumstances and tastes. Like The Spruce recommends, so long as you bear in mind tenets of keeping elements complementary, the charm of bringing together pieces from different eras can outweigh the benefits of consistency.

If you’re looking to integrate wood surfaces into your next design project, Arclin TFL is the place to start. Like all of our surfaces, wood-look TFL is durable, high-performing, low maintenance, and an environmentally friendly option. Contact us today to find out more.